Tested: Storck Rebel Seven

Words by Chris Southwood | Images by Flowtographers

The not-so-minor details

Product

Storck Rebel Seven

Contact

Storck Australia New Zealand
www.storck-anz.com

Price

AUD5,800.00

Weight

10.41kg

Size tested:

17"

Positives

Excellent flat-out race rocket.
Acceleration galore thanks to a very stiff frame.
Gorgeous construction through out.
Light and eager to milk speed out of the terrain.

Negatives

Not a very compliant ride.
Grips are uncomfortable.
Rear axle is not tool-free.

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Babies are delivered by storks. It’s a well known fact. Storcks, on the other hand, are delivered by couriers, in a box, or in this case two boxes.

The Storck Rebel Seven came to Flow HQ as a bare frame and build kit. This is a rarity; most bikes leave a factory in Taiwan 90% assembled with only some tweaking, tightening and lubing left to be done by the shop mechanic. While building the Storck from scratch took a while, it also gave us a chance to really appreciate the fine workmanship of the German-made frame. It also gave the whole assembly process a sense of ceremony, or anticipation, kinda like a gestation period.

Yep, it uses dem size wheels. We didn't expect to see so many brands producing 650B hardtails this year, but when they're winning World Cups it's tough to argue.

Yep, it uses dem size wheels. We didn’t expect to see so many brands producing 650B hardtails this year, but when they’re winning World Cups it’s tough to argue.

The Rebel 7 is a single-minded machine; a 27.5”-wheeled carbon cross country race hardtail. We’ll be honest, it’s the first of its ilk we’ve tested here at Flow, so it’s a challenge not to draw comparisons with a 29er hardtail, given that 29ers have been so dominant in the hardtail ranks over the past few years.

The Build:

Marcus Storck looks like a genius, and he is widely viewed as such by many in the bike industry. Behind that mighty forehead lurks a powerful design brain and the Rebel Seven is a very fine piece of work.

The rear end is super neat. We love the brake mount and the simplicity of the axle system (though it does require an Allen key to remove the axle).

The rear end is super neat. We love the brake mount and the simplicity of the axle system (though it does require an Allen key to remove the axle).

At 1.1kg, there are lighter frames, but it has a great finish – both aesthetic and construction-wise – with a reassuringly solid feel, especially through the chain stays and dropout area. It’s clearly a frame built with great power transfer in mind. Tube profiles are broad, especially the top tube, and the ‘super size chainstays’ are deep to resist flex.

The rear is built for stiffness and power transfer, rather than compliance. There's good clearance too for muddy conditions.

The rear is built for stiffness and power transfer, rather than compliance. There’s good clearance too for muddy conditions.

A host of practical features won us over. Smart cable guides with full-length gear housings make for simple setup and minimal maintenance. Sure, internal cables are nice… until they rattle or need replacing. A direct mount front derailleur makes for powerful, crisp shifts, and the use of a pressfit bottom bracket gives plenty of meat to this critical area.

A direct mount front derailleur with full length housing makes for easy setup and maintenance.

A direct mount front derailleur with full length housing makes for easy setup and maintenance.

The chain stay mounted rear brake looks good, especially with the adjustable banjo on the XT brakes allowing a very clean brake line routing to the caliper. Brake calipers with less angle adjustability for the brake line mightn’t look so neat. Given the bike’s purpose, it’s surprising that the 142x12mm rear axle requires tools for removal – in a race situation, most riders would prefer not to carry an 8mm Allen key. That said, the system is low profile and will never give you any dramas.

The bottom bracket area is seriously robust, as is the seat tube / top tube junction.

The bottom bracket area is seriously robust, as is the seat tube / top tube junction.

The geometry features what we’d call traditionally European cross country angles. It’s not common to see a 70-degree head angle on many newer bikes – such quick steering angles are the domain of serious cross-country racers. The wheelbase is compact too, with 425mm stays and 100mm stem on our medium sized bike to provide a decent reach.

Would you like to Super Size that for only an extra 50c?

Would you like to Super Size that for only an extra 50c?

The Parts:

If you’re stacking the Storck up alongside offerings from some of the bigger market players, the value for money won’t blow you away. But keeping in mind the boutique, German, handmade pedigree here, we feel that the build kit is pretty decent…. Except for the grips, which we found too fat and which aren’t lock-ons. An easy swap.

These can go. Thankfully a new set of grips is the only change we'd recommend out of the box.

These can go. Thankfully a new set of grips is the only change we’d recommend out of the box.

We’d have expected to see a Rockshox SID on the Rebel Seven, but while the Rockshox Revelation has a small weight penalty, its performance is very hard to fault. It’s a stiff steering option, and in conjunction with the Crank Bros cockpit it makes for a front end that goes exactly where you point it.

A 100mm-travel Revelation handles things up front. It's a real set and forget fork - there is a compression adjustment / lock out, but we never felt compelled to use it

A 100mm-travel Revelation handles things up front. It’s a real set and forget fork – there is a compression adjustment / lock out, but we never felt compelled to use it

Shimano provide the deceleration with immensely powerful XT brakes. We’d ideally drop down a rotor size up front to a 160mm (rather than the 180mm fitted) as the bigger rotor sometimes had too much bite for the bike, overpowering the tyres. Still, that’s a much better problem to have than the opposite!

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DT M1700 wheels set off the frame finish nicely and while they’re not the lightest wheelset, they’re stiff and reliable. They’re ordinarily a tubeless ready wheel, as are the tyres, though unfortunately ours didn’t come with the tubeless rims strip in the box. As we’ve stressed below, adding some more compliance to the ride is something we’d look to do, and going tubeless is the best solution.

Schwalbe's Racing Ralphs are a safe bet for just about all conditions.

Schwalbe’s Racing Ralphs are a safe bet for just about all conditions.

A matching Prologo saddle is a classy touch, and the Shimano 2×10 drivetrain is a wise choice, giving riders enough gears to get this light machine up just about anything.

We don't see that many Prologo saddles, but we think they're great.

We don’t see that many Prologo saddles, but we think they’re great.

Ride:

It had been a while since we last rode a bike as single-mindedly cross-country focused as the Rebel Seven, let alone one with little wheels (ok, mid-sized wheels technically… but 26” is so 2012). While we’re still dubious about all the claims that a 650B wheel offers ‘the best of both worlds’, there’s no denying how quickly these wheels get moving. This bike gets up and going faster than a dobberman chasing a commuter cyclist. The short chain stays, stiff wheels, crisp shifting and direct power transfer tell you to get up out of the saddle and click up a few gears out of every corner.

The frame is quite low and the wheelbase on the short side, so it's an easy bike to throw about.

The frame is quite low and the wheelbase on the short side, so it’s an easy bike to throw about.

At less than 10.5kg, the Rebel 7 is incredibly easy to move around. There’s no lethargy to the steering, it can be lifted and popped over every undulation in the trail. Thankfully it still doesn’t feel overly twitch, the wide (well wide given the style of bike) bar gives everything a touch of stability, as do the grippy tyres.

There’s definitely a knack to riding this style of bike, and coming off bigger wheels and longer travel it takes a little bit of smoothing out your riding style before you find some flow. The Rebel 7 isn’t happy if you plough and the chainslap against the carbon stays lets you know loudly if you’re riding roughshod, rather than floating. Sit-down riders (or regular dual suspension riders, like us) will soon be beaten out of their lazy ways.

The Crank Bros cockpit is stout and stiff. We approve of four-bolt stem and decent width bar.

The Crank Bros cockpit is stout and stiff. We approve of four-bolt stem and decent width bar.

While decent rubber and 100mm-travel fork provide a little more forgiveness than some other cross country hardtails, there’s still nothing particularly soft about the Storck. The large diameter 31.6mm aluminium seat post is at odds with the trend towards narrow, 27.2mm carbon posts – there is not a lot of give under your butt. As we’ve noted above, we didn’t have a tubeless conversion kit handy, but setting the Storck up tubeless is a wise move, so you can drop the pressures lower than we dared without fear of pinch flats.

It's a fun looking bike, and it's playful on the trail too. But it will punish you if you're sloppy!

It’s a fun looking bike, and it’s playful on the trail too. But it will punish you if you’re sloppy!

As you’d hope, the Storck is a fantastic climber, particularly in situations where sharp accelerations are needed, like getting up ledges or steep pinches. Get your timing wrong though and the rear wheel will kick back and skip, get it right and it shoots up any incline like a lizard up a tree. On the flipside, high speed descending requires a good nerve; the sharp head angle needs a firm hard on the tiller to avoid the front wheel tucking. We had a couple of hairy moments hitting sand at pace before we got back in the swing of things. Getting the bike off the ground and floating over the worst of it is the way to go, and the Storck is happy to oblige, its short wheelbase a pleasure to bunny hop.

Overall:

While the window of appeal for the Storck Rebel 7 is narrow, it hits the mark for those who know what they want from a cross-country race bike. Its construction is a true highlight, and when it comes to that critical aspect of acceleration, the Rebel 7 feels like it has an afterburner. We’d love to try the Rebel 9 (the 29er brother of the Rebel 7) by way of comparison to get a better feel of the trade off between weight, acceleration and abilities in technical terrain afforded by the two wheel sizes.

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