Tested: Trek Remedy 9 27.5

Words by Chris Southwood | Images by Flowtographer / Damian Breach

The not-so-minor details

Product

Trek Remedy 9 27.5

Contact

Trek Bikes Australia
www.trekbikes.com

  • Price: AUD4,699.00
  • Weight: 13.36kg
  • Size tested:: 17.5"

Positives

Excellent suspension.
No nonsense, go-for-year spec.
Stiff front end.
Well-rounded geometry.

Negatives

Narrow bar.
Cabling is untidy. Messy cockpit.

Us

About a year ago, we put the question to some Trek staff: “What are you guys doing with 27.5?” Their response? “Why would we do 27.5 when we’ve got the best 29ers on the market?” Very cagey! Six months later, and out come two new lines of 27.5″ bikes from Trek, including the one you see here, the Remedy 9 27.5. By the way, it’s very orange. Had you noticed?

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-1

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-31

Build:

The Remedy has been Trek’s all-mountain / trail bike for a number of years now, and it’s always been an impressive machine, well noted for its excellent suspension and spritely feel. For 2014, Trek have made two big changes to the Remedy. There’s the wheel size, obviously, with the Remedy now packing 27.5″ hoops, but they’ve also reduced the travel, back to 140mm from 150mm in previous generations.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-9

Well finished. Small things, like the way the fork crown sits so perfectly flush with the head tube, are very appealing.

It’s extremely rare to see a bike’s travel reduced from year to year. Ordinarily, advances in suspension technologies and efficiencies result in travel increases, so to see a reduction was a surprise.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-12

The Full Floater suspension system. The rear shock is not mounted to the mainframe, but floats between the upper link and a lower mount on the chain stay. Keeping it independent of the front triangle removes stress from the main frame and allows complete control over the shock rate.

There are two main reasons for the move, as we see it. The first is to create a logical progression in the Trek range. There’s the 120mm-travel Fuel EX, the 160mm-travel Slash enduro bike, and now the Remedy slots neatly in the middle at 140mm. The second reason relates to wheel size. With a larger diameter wheel, you can get away with a little bit less travel somewhat, especially in terms of sheer ability to roll over obstacles.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5 studio-29

The Active Braking Pivot system uses a concentric pivot around the rear axle which keeps the suspension largely unencumbered by braking forces. It also make chaining the derailleur hanger a pain in the butt.

In other respects, the Remedy is largely unchanged from previous years. It still uses Trek’s lively, active and smooth ABP / Full Floater suspension system and large-volume, twin-chambered DRCV shock. The frame is constructed Trek’s Alpha aluminium, with plenty of nice touches, including integrated down tube and chain slap protection, and internal cabling for the front and rear derailleurs. In spite of the internal shift cabling, somehow the cables do look cluttered and a bit messy overall, especially when compared to other bikes like the Focus SAM or Giant Trance which we’ve been riding lately.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-18

Down tube armouring and chain slap protection help keep the ride quiet and protect the bike in the long run too.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-20

Looks much neater than an old tube, huh? We like this kind of attention to detail!

The Remedy continues to run the Mino Link geometry adjustment system. Flipping the small chip/insert located the junction of the seat stay and EVO Link gives you a little over half a degree of head angle adjustment and lowers or raises the bottom bracket by 8mm. Given that the Remedy’s angles are already quite sharp by today’s standards, we left the bike in the slacker setting, for a 67.5-degree head angle. It’s really interesting to note that the Remedy’s head angle is actually steeper for 2014 than it was for 2013 (67.5 vs 67 degrees).

Trek Remedy 9 27.5 studio-11

Swapping this chip around will move the head angle from 67.5 to 68.2 degrees.

Spec:

We’ll say it now and get it off our chest. The Remedy’s handlebar is too narrow – it constricts this bike, and feels about five years out of date. In Trek’s defence, the only reason they supply the bike with this bar is because of some outdated Australian standards that stipulate a bike can’t have a bar over 700mm wide! So actually, every other brand is technically in the wrong from a legality perspective. Whatever the case, we fitted a 745mm bar to the very neat 70mm Bontrager Rhythm stem and felt much better.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-22

The Bontrager Rhythm stem is gorgeous. The bar should be swapped for something wider. Keep the original under your bed to ward off home invasions.

Trek kicked their product development team into overdrive and managed to develop new Bontrager 27.5″ wheels and tyres for the Remedy, and both items are really top notch. The Bontrager Rhythm wheelset and XR3 tyre combo is great. The tyres a massive for a claimed 2.35″ width and we rate their consistently grippy and fast-rolling tread pattern as one of our favourites. Our test bike was set up tubeless with Bontrager’s own plastic rim strips installed. These don’t come with the bike ordinarily, but Trek dealers can supply them. Other standout Bontrager items are the Evoke saddle (this tester’s favourite) and Rhythm grips.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-16

‘AWESOME,’ say our arses. The Bontrager Evoke saddle is tops.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-5

Bontrager’s tyre program keeps on kicking goals. Read more about the development of these tyres here in our interview with tyre designer Frank Stacy.

Shimano’s XT drivetrain and brakes are the pick for the Remedy 9. The 2×10 drivetrain and clutch derailleur is precise, quiet and gave us mercifully low gears when climbing big hills with a heavy pack in the Snowy Mountains. Of course, there are ISCG mounts if you’d rather a single ring.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5 studio-12

The 2×10 drivetrain uses a direct mount front mech. With an XT Shadow Plus clutch rear derailleur, we didn’t drop a chain once during testing.

We had a weird recurring issue with the brakes on our test bike; the pads would appear contaminated (lacking power and making lots of noise) when we first hopped on the bike after not riding it for a week or so. After a couple of minutes of riding, they had come good again and the power was back to normal… Strange! We can only assume it was either some minor oil seepage, salt air or ghosts. Probably the latter. Regardless, Trek and Shimano assure us they’ve not had it happen on any other 2014 model bikes and the XT brakes are generally amongst the best out there.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-15

One, two, three clamps on the left hand side of the bar. Compared to the elegant solution of SRAM’s Match Maker all-in-one mount (with combines shifter, brake and seat post remote levers) this setup is messy.

 Rounding out the package is a RockShox Reverb Stealth post with 125mm of adjustability. The handlebar is rather cluttered – it would’ve been nice touch if Trek had opted to utilise Shimano’s I-Spec combined shifter/brake mounts to tidy up the cockpit.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5 studio-17

The Reverb Stealth post has been getting huge amounts of OEM spec this year, and we’re happy about that. It delivers 125mm of adjustability smoothy and with little lateral play that can affect some adjustable posts.

Ride:

The Remedy is engaging, fun and lively ride. That’s a feeling that we’ve always found with Trek’s Remedy range, and we’re glad the addition of slightly bigger wheels haven’t dumbed down this playfulness at all. In fact, the bigger wheel size really slipped out of view on the trail. This isn’t to say that there aren’t benefits to be found with the slightly larger 27.5″ wheel when compared to a 26er, just that there aren’t any obvious negative traits to leave us wishing for a smaller wheel once again.

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Trek’s ABP / Full Floater suspension is one of the best. It’s a superbly responsive system, it just ripples over the terrain, soaking up the little bumps like they’re not even there. Factor in the large volume tyres and you’ve got one very smooth ride indeed. The FOX 34 fork is a worth accompaniment as well, though we did find the rear suspension outshone the front in terms of sheer sensitivity. In the dusty test conditions, we liked to apply a small amount of suspension Teflon spray to the fork legs before each ride to help keep the fork slick and smooth like the rear end.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-11

The DRCV shock is made by FOX purely for Trek bikes. It features two air chambers, the second of which is only opened once the shock moves deeper into its travel. The idea is to provide support in the initial stroke, while delivering a more linear spring curve later in the travel for better big hit performance.

There’s very little anti-squat built into the Trek’s suspension curve, which does mean it’s prone to suspension bobbing if you mash the pedals and it can wallow a little on steeper, technical climbs. The upside to this is that the Trek has negligible pedal feedback when pedalling over rough terrain, making it easy to stay on the gas, and there is mountain of rear wheel grip because the chain isn’t causing the suspension to stiffen. Of course, there’s always the shock’s CTD adjustment if you want to firm things up for more efficiency, and running the FOX shock in its middle Trail setting goes a long way to removing all pedal induced bob at the slight expense of some of that silky small bump compliance.

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What you looking at, Chris? On long climbs, we used to shock Trail setting to firm up the rear end and pedal bob.

One of the clear areas that demonstrates Trek have listened to the public and the media’s feedback is the fork choice on the new Remedy. In 2013, the Remedy had a FOX 32 fork which lacked the stiffness to really make the most of the bike’s descending potential. For 2014, Trek have gone for FOX 34 it makes a world of difference. What is pretty amazing, is that even though the 2014 Remedy has both steeper geometry and less travel than it did in 2013, it descends even better. The fork stiffness, along with the bigger wheels, surely play a part in the this. We particularly appreciated the beefier fork on the really big hits; the stiffer chassis helps avoid any binding or spiking and allows the fork to keep up with the bottomless rear suspension feel delivered by the DRCV rear shock.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-4

There’s nothing wrong with fat legs. The FOX 34 adds welcomed precision and directness to the Remedy’s handling.

We felt really comfortable descending on the Remedy from the very outset. One of our favourite test trails features some steep, swooping chutes/gullies, the bottom of which is littered with loose, sliding pieces of rock. We have a standout memory of just how composed the Remedy felt tackling this bit of trail; even when hard on the brakes, with both wheels sliding around, the Remedy left us feeling like we were in total control, with time up our sleeve to negotiate the next drop or corner.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-27

Watch that sucker on rocks! The ABP skewer sticks out a mighty long way.

On less extreme terrain, the Remedy doesn’t feel like overkill. In fact, we were distinctly reminded of our time on board the Fuel EX 9.8 26er (still one of our favourite all-time bikes). It feels flickable and fun, pouncing on the next bit of trail rather than flopping from corner to corner, and the low slung top tube encourages you to move the bike about.

Overall:Trek Remedy 9 27.5-30Trek’s new Remedy 9 is a worthy successor in this prestigious line of bikes. While the reduced travel and steeper geometry had the potential to take a bit of the fire out of this bike, we don’t feel like it really has, and the bike’s abilities as a do-it-all machine are as strong as ever. As a package, this is definitely one of the most appealing trail machines on the market and you’d be hard pressed to find a better place to drop your four and half(ish) gees if technical trail riding is your kettle of fish.

Trek Remedy 9 27.5-2

Rider: Chris Southwood
Height: 174cm
Weight: 63kg
Tested at: Thredbo, Glenrock and Red Hill NSW

Them

Remedy is the ultimate technical trail bike. Light frame, plush suspension, and precise handling all add up to a stellar ride that goes up, goes down, goes everywhere.

Upgrades from Remedy 8 27.5/650b

  • Fox Factory fork w/Kashima coat
  • Bontrager Rhythm Comp TLR wheels
  • Shimano XT Shadow Plus drivetrain
  • Shimano XT brakes
  • RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper post

You