Flow’s First Bite: Trek Fuel EX 9.8 29er – First Ride

It was only a couple of weeks ago that Trek announced the release of the new Fuel EX 29 series – a 29″-wheeled version of their immensely popular 26″ trail bike. The global press launch of this bike is going on right now over in the USA, but we’ve been lucky enough to score a full-blown test right here, on Australian soil. Here are our first impressions after ride number one.

The dull light at Stromlo this afternoon doesn’t do this bike’s finish any justice – it almost looks like polished dark mahogany in the light!

We’ve just come back in from a couple of hours on the trails around Stromlo Forest Park, getting ourselves acquainted with the Fuel EX 9.8 29, the second from top in the new EX 29er range. Tomorrow we’ll be taking the EX to some rougher, super technical Canberra trails before bringing it back to Flow’s own neighbourhood for some longer term testing.

Trek’s James Collins preps our test bike, prior to its maiden voyage.

This is the bike that people have been crying out for from Trek – a lightweight 29er trail bike, taking advantage of all their technologies that they’ve spent the last half dozen years refining. Until now, other 29er offerings from Trek haven’t utilised the same Full-Floater/ABP suspension system that has won Trek accolades world wide. The new 29er Fuel takes these suspension technologies and couples them with the excellent G2 geometry concept that found on the other ‘Gary Fisher Collection’ 29ers in Trek’s range (the Superfly and Rumblefish).

The Fuel EX 29er is the first 29er from Trek to make full use of the brand’s awesome Full Floater/ABP suspension platform. The one-piece EVO Link ties to all together stiffly, allowing the DRCV shock to do get to work without having to contend with any flex.

From our first ride we can tell you this bike is a winner. It retains the same taut, responsive and efficient feel of the 26″ Fuel EX but is just plain faster, especially on the climbs. Lumpy, ugly slow speed climbs are a delight on this bike; it’s pretty inspiring really!

A full XT drivetrain and brakes means worry-free performance. We appreciate the choice of a twin-ring crankset, rather than a triple.

The overall bike dimensions have grown when compared to the 26er, but the Fuel still feels playful. A super low stand-over height and low head tube height gives it a compact feel, encouraging you to chuck it about. The exceptional frame stiffness hasn’t been diluted at all with the longer stays either, and the Bontrager Rhythm wheels exhibit no flex.

We’d have to say the build kit is close to perfect as well. Amazing braking and shifting, and the Rockshox Reverb Stealth is the icing on the cake. We wouldn’t change a thing.

Arguably the best dropper post on the market is part of the deal.

This particular model, equipped with a Rockshox Reverb Stealth post, full XT drivetrain and constructed from Trek’s OCLV Mountain Carbon throughout, retails for $5500 and weighs in a bit over 12kg. But there are some very sweet price point bikes, including the EX9 which has largely the same build kit (with an alloy bar and a couple of other tiny changes) but runs an alloy frame – it retails at $3999, making it a really hot ticket item. You can also pick up the EX 9.7 for the same price. It runs a carbon mainframe and a slightly lower specced component package, making it a prime bike to buy now and upgrade along the way.

For the 26″ fans, don’t stress! 26″ Fuel EX bikes will still be available…for now.

We’ll have a full review up soon, as well as featuring the bike in issue #4 of Flow mag too (on sale 3 July). You can view our full video review of the 2013 26″ Fuel EX 9.8 here to whet your appetite.

 

Flow's First Bite: Trek Fuel EX 9.8 29er – First Ride

It was only a couple of weeks ago that Trek announced the release of the new Fuel EX 29 series – a 29″-wheeled version of their immensely popular 26″ trail bike. The global press launch of this bike is going on right now over in the USA, but we’ve been lucky enough to score a full-blown test right here, on Australian soil. Here are our first impressions after ride number one.

The dull light at Stromlo this afternoon doesn’t do this bike’s finish any justice – it almost looks like polished dark mahogany in the light!

We’ve just come back in from a couple of hours on the trails around Stromlo Forest Park, getting ourselves acquainted with the Fuel EX 9.8 29, the second from top in the new EX 29er range. Tomorrow we’ll be taking the EX to some rougher, super technical Canberra trails before bringing it back to Flow’s own neighbourhood for some longer term testing.

Trek’s James Collins preps our test bike, prior to its maiden voyage.

This is the bike that people have been crying out for from Trek – a lightweight 29er trail bike, taking advantage of all their technologies that they’ve spent the last half dozen years refining. Until now, other 29er offerings from Trek haven’t utilised the same Full-Floater/ABP suspension system that has won Trek accolades world wide. The new 29er Fuel takes these suspension technologies and couples them with the excellent G2 geometry concept that found on the other ‘Gary Fisher Collection’ 29ers in Trek’s range (the Superfly and Rumblefish).

The Fuel EX 29er is the first 29er from Trek to make full use of the brand’s awesome Full Floater/ABP suspension platform. The one-piece EVO Link ties to all together stiffly, allowing the DRCV shock to do get to work without having to contend with any flex.

From our first ride we can tell you this bike is a winner. It retains the same taut, responsive and efficient feel of the 26″ Fuel EX but is just plain faster, especially on the climbs. Lumpy, ugly slow speed climbs are a delight on this bike; it’s pretty inspiring really!

A full XT drivetrain and brakes means worry-free performance. We appreciate the choice of a twin-ring crankset, rather than a triple.

The overall bike dimensions have grown when compared to the 26er, but the Fuel still feels playful. A super low stand-over height and low head tube height gives it a compact feel, encouraging you to chuck it about. The exceptional frame stiffness hasn’t been diluted at all with the longer stays either, and the Bontrager Rhythm wheels exhibit no flex.

We’d have to say the build kit is close to perfect as well. Amazing braking and shifting, and the Rockshox Reverb Stealth is the icing on the cake. We wouldn’t change a thing.

Arguably the best dropper post on the market is part of the deal.

This particular model, equipped with a Rockshox Reverb Stealth post, full XT drivetrain and constructed from Trek’s OCLV Mountain Carbon throughout, retails for $5500 and weighs in a bit over 12kg. But there are some very sweet price point bikes, including the EX9 which has largely the same build kit (with an alloy bar and a couple of other tiny changes) but runs an alloy frame – it retails at $3999, making it a really hot ticket item. You can also pick up the EX 9.7 for the same price. It runs a carbon mainframe and a slightly lower specced component package, making it a prime bike to buy now and upgrade along the way.

For the 26″ fans, don’t stress! 26″ Fuel EX bikes will still be available…for now.

We’ll have a full review up soon, as well as featuring the bike in issue #4 of Flow mag too (on sale 3 July). You can view our full video review of the 2013 26″ Fuel EX 9.8 here to whet your appetite.

 

The Escape

In BC, when winter descends upon us with its icy blanket, all the riding closes down…

the escape from Union Production Co. on Vimeo.

Determined to escape the grasp of winter and shake off its snowy shackles, our two riders will set forth from Whistler to circumnavigate the Strait of Georgia.

The route will be completed by bicycle and with the riders towing all their supplies. Traveling by mountain bike – less suited for the roads but tailored to the gems of off-road trails – should enable them to link up exquisite trails networks and riding communities that exist throughout British Columbia.

Each town in British Columbia seems to offer better singletrack than the last one visited. To prove what’s out there Dave Roth and Seb Kemp cycled, on mountain bikes, from Whistler around the Strait of Georgia, stopping in Squamish, the Sunshine Coast, Powell River, Cumberland, Hornby Island, Parksville, Duncan and Saturna Island.

This trip is about the pleasure of the road and the thrill of the trails. We want to show everyone that, yes, nothing is easy, but the rewards of seeking soothe all hardship.

We want to remind the world that adventure is on your own doorstep, if only you get off the couch to seek it. It is about celebrating the world we ride within. It is also about the communities and individuals that dare imagine, build, and nourish so that mountain biking can flourish.

Danny MacAskill – Time To Ride

Episode 4 of ‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’ is released and it’s ’Time to ride’.

Today sees the release of the fourth instalment of ‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’ and it is ‘Time to ride’ as the shooting days for Danny’s biggest and most ambitious riding clip to date approach.

The warehouse begins to take shape.

Having undergone 6 months of intense recuperation following a career threatening back surgery, Danny is now back on his bike on a daily basis looking to take his riding to the next level and develop brand new ticks for his project. A day riding with friend and trials legend Martyn Ashton in Glasgow is a perfect opportunity.

“Its been really wicked riding with Danny, I know he’s a younger rider than me but weirdly he’s one of my heroes too…he’s got some amazing skills”

As Kelvin Hall, the filming venue for the project, begins to take shape with numerous props built and shipped in, the enormity of the project hits Danny.

“I just really want to make something that we are proud of and everyone who has been part of it to think it has been worth it…”

This is the last we see of Danny as the warehouse goes into lockdown and the cameras start to roll – will he be able to take his riding to the level required to realise his dreams for the film?

Danny looks for some props for the new riding clip.

 

Jon Television – Into The Wild

Inspired by Sean Penn’s classical masterpiece “Into The Wild”, this film is about the essence of mountain biking.

Don’t give your entire $24.000 savings account to charity, abandon all your possessions and hitchhike to Alaska without telling anyone, but for the love of God, don’t waste all of your precious time fighting over wheel-sizes, strange marketing moves or economic materialism. Make sure most if it is time well spent: on your bike, in the wild.

Avid – Chasing Trail, Curtis Keene

Enduro racer Curtis Keene has ridden trails all over the world. From dry, desert rock to deep forest singletrack, Curtis says it’s all about getting after it and experiencing what’s out there.

Avid brakes help Curtis ride fast and win races—but more importantly they put powerful, reliable performance right at his fingertips every time he rides. So he can think less about his bike and more about Chasing Trail.

Bec Henderson Holds Onto Leader's Jersey

Here’s what Bec had to say on her blog post race:

Just one week separated the first two World Cup’s of the 2013 Season, I had a dream race at round one and was looking forward to racing in Nove Mesto, Czech Republic as it is one of my favorite courses on the circuit.

After such a high from last weekend with both Dan and I winning our races I came down with a cold, which I had been battling all week. My week leading into the race had a big shake up and I had only easy days on the road and course all the way through till the day before the race where I did my best to blow all the cobwebs (and the rest) out despite the soaring heart rate.



I went into the race with mixed emotions, I was so positive with my bike and set up, I chose the Superfly 100 dual suspension for the weekend, kitted out with full iCD (electronic) lockout front and rear from Fox. Absolutely amazing! I was also feeling a little frustrated knowing I wasn’t 100% and blowing up in the race was basically inevitable. BUT, you can only race with what you bring to the start line and it’s not always going to be perfect. I did, however, have the leaders jersey on and a purpose…

We were up for four laps and a start loop of the technically challenging and unforgiving course. I started well and was in the top five or six girls as we crested the first major climb. I was getting good recovery on the descents with the full suspension and it was a clear advantage.

Here’s part of the reason Bec opted for a dual suspension bike!

Andrea Waldis of Colnago started fast again and wasn’t afraid to keep the pace hot throughout the race, after getting caught up in a little traffic early I lifted my own pace and bridged across to Waldis but was making a few mistakes and playing a bit of catch up. At this point I was feeling good all round including the climbing and on the third lap there were some hard attacks going down, but I could never get that advantage and Waldis defended really strong.

It was up one of the steepest climbs where she broke me, with one and a half laps remaining. I went into survival mode, now just desperate to hold onto my second place and the leaders jersey. I had to dig really deep, my legs were killing and I was running on empty but I managed to keep clear of third place and cross the line on the podium again.


I was really happy with my race, I made a few mistakes tactically and technically but I definitely gave myself the best possible chance to win the race. I struggled to fuel myself properly but today I just didn’t have the legs to go with Andrea. For me, it’s all positive, I was surprised to ride so well considering the circumstances and I have extended my lead in the World Cup series. There are now four races remaining, the next in Val di Sole, Italy with lots of steep climbing. I’m looking forward to getting stuck into some more training and slipping into that white skinsuit again!

Bec Henderson Holds Onto Leader’s Jersey

Here’s what Bec had to say on her blog post race:

Just one week separated the first two World Cup’s of the 2013 Season, I had a dream race at round one and was looking forward to racing in Nove Mesto, Czech Republic as it is one of my favorite courses on the circuit.

After such a high from last weekend with both Dan and I winning our races I came down with a cold, which I had been battling all week. My week leading into the race had a big shake up and I had only easy days on the road and course all the way through till the day before the race where I did my best to blow all the cobwebs (and the rest) out despite the soaring heart rate.



I went into the race with mixed emotions, I was so positive with my bike and set up, I chose the Superfly 100 dual suspension for the weekend, kitted out with full iCD (electronic) lockout front and rear from Fox. Absolutely amazing! I was also feeling a little frustrated knowing I wasn’t 100% and blowing up in the race was basically inevitable. BUT, you can only race with what you bring to the start line and it’s not always going to be perfect. I did, however, have the leaders jersey on and a purpose…

We were up for four laps and a start loop of the technically challenging and unforgiving course. I started well and was in the top five or six girls as we crested the first major climb. I was getting good recovery on the descents with the full suspension and it was a clear advantage.

Here’s part of the reason Bec opted for a dual suspension bike!

Andrea Waldis of Colnago started fast again and wasn’t afraid to keep the pace hot throughout the race, after getting caught up in a little traffic early I lifted my own pace and bridged across to Waldis but was making a few mistakes and playing a bit of catch up. At this point I was feeling good all round including the climbing and on the third lap there were some hard attacks going down, but I could never get that advantage and Waldis defended really strong.

It was up one of the steepest climbs where she broke me, with one and a half laps remaining. I went into survival mode, now just desperate to hold onto my second place and the leaders jersey. I had to dig really deep, my legs were killing and I was running on empty but I managed to keep clear of third place and cross the line on the podium again.


I was really happy with my race, I made a few mistakes tactically and technically but I definitely gave myself the best possible chance to win the race. I struggled to fuel myself properly but today I just didn’t have the legs to go with Andrea. For me, it’s all positive, I was surprised to ride so well considering the circumstances and I have extended my lead in the World Cup series. There are now four races remaining, the next in Val di Sole, Italy with lots of steep climbing. I’m looking forward to getting stuck into some more training and slipping into that white skinsuit again!

Fresh Product: New SRAM X7 Type 2 Rear Derailleur

X0 technology at the X7 level. Reduces chain bounce and chain slap, easiest wheel removal, fits on the bike you have now, and German engineered mechanism.

TYPE 2, the same rear derailleur technology as 2X10 X0 and X9 drivetrains, has now arrived for SRAM X7. Time to take chain control to the next level.

The versatile, highly capable X7 product family brings high-end precision and reliability to midrange mountain bike components. Unbeatable X-GLIDE shifting teamed up with ROLLER BEARING CLUTCH and CAGE LOCK technologies boost your confidence in all types of terrain, from your local trails to the most challenging backcountry singletrack.

SPECIFICATIONS

•  Exact Actuation for precise and dependable 10-speed performance \
•  Focused chassis design for all conditions and usage
•  293g
•  36-tooth cassette capable
•  3 cage lengths available: short, medium and long

Prepare yourself for the ride ahead.

Darren Berrecloth to ride at Melrose Fat Tyre Festival

The Slopestyle legend Darren “Bear Claw” Berrecloth has recently confirmed he will be attending the 2013 Melrose Fat Tyre Festival from June 7 – 10 2013.

Darren recently starred in the movie “Where the Trail Ends” and is widely known for his exploits in the Slopestyle scene. The Crankworx Whistler champion is “dropping into Melrose” on his way to the Munich X games on June 27 – 30 and is “stoked to come and hang out at our event”

“Darren has an incredibly busy schedule during the northern summer and this year is no exception so we are really lucky and super excited that he has chosen to come to the Flinders Ranges,” said Richard Bruce, Melrose FTF event organiser.

The Claw will be running some skills sessions, participating in the Super D enduro and having some fun at the Bicycle Speedway challenge.

Cedric Gracia Through my eyes #1 – Punta Ala

The Brigade, with Cedric Gracia and Bryan Regnier was at Punta Ala this week-end for the first Enduro World Series, in Italy.

All the season, follow the team with theses movies. We want to try to give you guys the opportunity to travel with us.

Enjoy It !

Cedric Gracia Through my eyes #1 – Punta Ala from Lucas Stanus on Vimeo.

Fresh Product: Maxxis Minion DHR II Tubeless Ready tyres

Finally, Maxxis have released a mid-weight tubeless-ready version of their most popular tyres! If you wanted to go tubeless with Maxxis previously you’ve had to choose between either a heavier LUST tyre or risk running a non-tubeless tyre (which tended not to seal up as well).

The trail version of the Maxxis Minion DHR II features the same tread pattern as its downhill counterpart, but uses a single-ply casing to reduce weight. With side knobs borrowed from the legendary Minion DHF, but widened to provide more support, the DHR II corners like no other. The center tread features ramped knobs to improve acceleration and sipes to create a smooth transition when leaning the bike. Paddle-like knobs on the center tread dig in under hard braking and help keep the bike under control. Pair it with a Minion DHF up front for the ultimate aggressive trail riding tire combo!

Fresh Product: Niner Cogalicious RDO Ti singlespeed cog

Cogalicious RDO turns Nervous Nellies into Single Speed Spartans. With a surface hardness far exceeding that of aluminum alloys, Cogalicious RDO will keep you in the battle longer and the unmistakable titanium appearance will strike fear in your adversaries.

6AL/4V Ti alloy available in 17-22T with deep, tall singlespeed tooth profile and a wide offset base for easy chainline tuning. Spacer Kit and Lockring included with awesome reusable Niner Small Parts Tin. 19T = 26g.

  • 6/AL/4V titanium singlespeed cog
  • Thick offset base protects alloy freehub bodies
  • Flipable to fine tune chainline
  • Available in 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, and 22 tooth sizes
  • Includes Spacer and lockring kit in reuseable Niner tin
  • 26g for 19t cog

Aaron Gwin: One Man, One Mountain

In case you’d forgotten what the fastest man on two wheels looks like when destroying a trail…

What happens when you take Red Bull mountain bike athlete Aaron Gwin, put him on a Specialized Demo 8 Carbon and film him on an amazing trail in Idyllwild, California?

You get the kind of velocity on two wheels that most of us can only ever dream of. This is insane.

Andy Blair Makes It A Hatrick and Rowena Fry Dominates

Andy Blair left his rivals in the dust, winning the final Stage of the Ingkerreke Commercial Mountain Bike Enduro in Alice Springs today, cementing his yellow leader’s jersey for the third year in a row; whilst Rowena Fry continued her classy in-form week also taking the win at Stage 7 and sealing her general classification yellow jersey victory.

Andy Blair crosses the line to take the win and overall title.

Stage 7 proved to be one of the best and most enjoyed stages of the five day, seven stage event, showcasing why Alice Springs is the hidden gem for mountain bikers around Australia. The final Stage saw riders take to a 36km fast course with varying terrain of single and 4WD tracks, beginning at the Chifley Alice Springs Resort and finishing at the scenic Telegraph Station reserve.

Blair dominated the week, winning all but two stages to wear the famed yellow jersey for a third year in a row, throughout all Stages. His winning time today of 1:34.45 gives him another time-bonus, to finish the week on top of the general classifications with a cumulative time of 9:44.30; ahead of Swell-Specialized teammate Shaun Lewis in second with 9:46.39, and fast finishing Michael Crosbie in third place just over four minutes behind.

“I came here with a job to do and it’s really great to get a hat-trick!” Blair said.

“When you come to Alice Springs, there’s a lot of things that can go wrong throughout a week of racing, so I was lucky enough to only have 1 flat tyre (Tuesday’s stage) and was able to make up for that and stay in the lead all week.” Added Blair.

The humble winner was wrapped to go one-two with Lewis.

“Shaun has looked after me all week, and it’s been awesome going 1 and 2 together. I was in a good position through the stages, but you can never count your chickens until you cross the line on Friday.” Blair said.

Lewis finished second to Blair on general classification overall, and was also the winner of last nights’ spectacular night race; crossing just 0.04 seconds ahead of Blair.

“I’m stoked by my riding this week. We came here as a team, so to go one-two with Blair who is the stronger rider, I’m really happy to finish second behind him. Hopefully I’ll be back next year too!” Lewis said.

Third place overall, and winner of Stage 3 Michael Crosbie (who rides for Rush Racing), hit the trails of Alice Springs for the first time on Monday and along with being a top contender all week, he was blown away by the diversity of the terrain.

“Firstly, I could not believe how much single track there is up here; and the diversity! You go from rock to sand; there’s little pinch climbs everywhere, awesome little descents; and lots of double track and fire roads that are super clean.” Crosbie said.

“I’m very happy with third overall – I’ll definitely be back again.” Added Crosbie.

In the women’s field, Rowena Fry was all class, and despite being pushed non-stop through the week by Jenny Fay, she managed to win 5 Stages and stay in the yellow on top of the general classification. Fry’s total cumulative time was 10:46.33; Fay took second place overall with 11:12.04, and Alice Springs born Terri Rhodes took third with 11:27.32.

Rowena Fry celebrates her victory.

Fry finished her stellar week simulating ‘plank-man’ over the finish line today winning the final stage in 1:49.50, with Rhodes second in 1:57.25 & Kelly Bartlett taking third place with a time of 1:57.26.

“I’m stocked with the win today and to take out the yellow jersey here in Alice Springs!” Fry exclaimed.

“The trails are absolutely pristine! A fantastic way to finish a ‘top top’ event; and I think all the riders had a blast!” Continued Fry.

“Yesterday was a tough day losing time on the individual time trial, but last nights’ Stage race was crucial for me, and I had a ball mixing it up amongst the guys and riding through mud puddles.” Fry said.

Fry took her hat off to the determined Fay, who despite building some fantastic form through the week, suffered from a mechanical in last nights’ stage, and a flat tyre today.

“Hats off to Jenny Fay; she was absolutely smashing me on the fire roads, and I was hanging on by a thread. I couldn’t wait to get to the single track (my forte) and I was wrapped to really just enjoy the day. It’s been great racing all week with Jenny and I’ve had a blast; I’ll definitely be back again next year.” Fry said.

Stage 7 second place Terri Rhodes grew up in Adelaide, but was born in Alice Springs and was very exciting about her racing all week.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the first stage, the night race and then today’s stage. It’s the single track I really enjoy. I pretty much rode along with a smile on my face – it was a really nice day.” Rhodes said.

“This is my third time in the Enduro; but the first time I felt like I was in good form, so it’s really nice to come back to my home time and go well.” Added Rhodes.

The feeling amongst all riders in the 2013 Ingkerreke Commercial MTB Enduro was that of elation and sense of achievement in an iconic Australian location – the spectacular red centre.

One rider to add some flair to the exciting week of racing was John Groves of Victoria who crossed nearly every finish line doing the ‘plank’ on his bike, and was therefore known amongst riders as the infamous ‘plank man’ (with which Fry simulated).

“It’s my first time to Alice Springs and this stage race is something I’ve wanted to do for a number of years.” Groves said.

“Now that time permits, I’ve made it up here and it couldn’t be much better! I love the loose trails, it makes it more exciting and my favourite stage was today for sure; I was taking in the views and really enjoyed riding along the fun single track and down all the rock faces.” Groves said.

Whilst the pointy end of the field had some fast finishing Stage races, each category also showcased some fierce competition. Michael Brill won the veterans (40-49) age group today, and took out the general classification to finish off a great week of mountain biking.

“The riding through Alice Springs is just amazing; the tracks are just awesome and I’ve had such a great time. I’m absolutely spent, but I’ve loved it.” Brill said.

STAGE SEVEN MEN

  1. Andy Blair                            01:34.45
  2. Shaun Lewis                       01:34.45
  3. Michael Crosbie                01:35.19

STAGE SEVEN WOMEN

  1. Rowena Fry                        01:49.50
  2. Terri Rhodes                      01:57.25
  3. Kelly Bartlett                      01:57.26

OVERALL STANDINGS MEN (Total Cumulative Time –All Stages)

  1. Andy Blair                            9:44.30
  2. Shaun Lewis                       9:46.39
  3. Michael Crosbie                9:51.03

OVERALL STANDINGS WOMEN (Total Cumulative Time –All Stages)

  1. Rowena Fry                        10:46.33
  2. Jenny Fay                            11:12.04
  3. Terri Rhodes                      11:27.32

 

All over, until next year.

The UCI World Cup Kicks Off This Weekend

With the UCI World Cup kicking off this weekend enjoy this slow-mo clip of cross-country action.


The UCI Cross-Country MTB World Cup season starts in earnest this weekend in Albstadt, Germany, with the women’s and the men’s races on Sunday (May 19).

Our super slow-motion clip featuring action from last year’s cross-country season shows the sheer physical effort the athletes put in to compete professionally at this level.

Watch the cross-country races from the opening round of the UCI XCO World Cup at Albstadt LIVE on Red Bull TV from 11.18 CET on May 19.

 

TRUVATIV BlackBox Athlete Series

It started nearly two decades ago with the original RockShox BoXXer and our desire to provide completely personalized support to a special group of riders.

The goal was to give our team a clear performance advantage in World Cup competition, and to win races. In this relentless pursuit of the podium, no rider request was too crazy or too costly—the average yearly salary of a pro mountain biker wouldn’t have covered the manufacturing cost of those gen-1 BoXXers.

It paid off. We won races and wrote some of the most exciting stories in mountain-bike history. With our athletes’ successes—and failures—we learned what worked, and what didn’t. Some of those BlackBox technologies have made it to market.

As the sport evolved, the BlackBox program extended beyond RockShox. Across the SRAM brand family, if it could extend the boundaries of mountain biking, the BlackBox team was there to develop new products and technologies.

When our athletes asked for a different kind of handlebar, TRUVATIV answered with the BooBar, a bar designed to meet the demands of World Cup downhilling, as well as the discerning feel of our athletes. And now we’re proud to announce the TRUVATIV BlackBox Athlete Series, a collection of bars specifically engineered to match the demands of each signature athlete’s discipline and riding style—and to enhance each rider’s cockpit interface.

DANNY HART BLACKBOX BAR – THE RIGHT ANGLE.

Danny Hart. He rides fast and loose. He turns the impossible into the ride of a lifetime. Danny spends countless hours working with his trainers and coaches to get more traction, power, and speed — and how to build the bike that’ll get him there. In the past, Danny used a 5mm space under his direct mount stem combined with a 20mm rise Boobar to lift him to the exact height he wanted, but that setup wasn’t seamless.

Designed by Danny himself, the new TRUVATIV Danny Hart BlackBox bar delivers the 25mm rise that he  needs — with no spacers and less weight. We also  added two more degrees of back sweep for a total 9 degrees, which moves his weight back, putting more pressure on the rear wheel. That keeps him exactly where he wants to be — on the trail, smashing turns.

Danny Hart BlackBox bar.
  • 7050 Al Alloy
  • 780mm wide
  • 25mm rise
  • 5˚ up-sweep
  • 9˚ back-sweep
  • 340g

 

JEROME CLEMENTZ BLACKBOX BAR – DEGREES OF PERFECTION.

Jerome Clementz. He’s an all-mountain legend whose name is synonymous with mountain bike enduro. Megavalanche, Mountain of Hell, Enduro des Nations — Jerome Clementz has won them all. Staying at the top means he needs to go even faster with as little effort as possible. Jerome asked us for wider, stiffer, lighter bar that gives him ultimate control without sacrificing the toughness he needs for powerful sprints and descents.

Working one-on-one with Jerome, we created the TRUVATIV Jerome Clementz carbon BlackBox bar — 750mm of carbon fiber perfection. With 5 degrees of up sweep and 7 degrees of back sweep, this signature bar keeps your bike light and strong so that you can rail every turn with precision.

Jerome Clementz carbon BlackBox bar.
  • Carbon Fiber
  • 750mm wide
  • 20mm rise
  • 5˚ up-sweep
  • 7˚ back-sweep
  • 240g

 

STEVIE SMITH BLACKBOX BAR – RAISING THE BAR.

Stevie Smith. He rides the gnarliest terrain extremely fast. He’s a brute, strong, powerful and pointed straight down the mountain. Stevie lives in a place where the trees can swallow you whole so his style requires a heads-up approach.

We teamed up with Stevie to create a bar that is high and out in front, giving him ultimate control. His signature 780mm downhill bar features a 30mm rise, keeping his hands forward, his head up, and his eyes focused. It’s the strength, stiffness, and quality you’ve come to expect from TRUVATIV —  but with some Stevie Smith baked in.

Steve Smith BlackBox bar.
  • 7050 Al Alloy
  • 780mm wide
  • 30mm rise
  • 5˚ up-sweep
  • 7˚ back-sweep
  • 340g

Trek Unleashes Top Mountain Bikers On Enduro Racing

Trek Bicycle is sending a hit squad of its top mountain bikers from all corners of the sport and globe to conquer the newly-formed Enduro World Series.

The group of athletes hails from international hotbeds of mountain biking such as the US, Switzerland, New Zealand, UK, and France. It brings together talented stars of cross-country, downhill, and enduro to try their hand at the fast-growing format that demands a well-rounded rider. With athletes from a variety of backgrounds and representing different team programs, Trek riders will be piloting the Remedy and Slash at every stop of the 2013 Enduro World Series.

Rene Wildhaber (CH) is the most decorated enduro racer in the world, with six wins at the Alpe d’Huez Megavalanche, seven victories at the Trek Bike Attack Lenzerheide, and dozens of other titles in enduro-style events in the past decade. He has ridden all over the world, from his native Switzerland to Nepal to Whistler, and continues to be one of enduro’s greatest ambassadors.

World champion downhiller Tracy Moseley (UK) is used to being at the top level of sport, and while she may have retired from the World Cup, she hasn’t slowed one bit. Her domination of the UK and Ireland Gravity Enduro Series’, along with the occasional XC victory show she’ll be a major competitor in enduro.

When cross-country racing wasn’t technical enough for his tastes, Colorado native “Rad” Ross Schnell reinvented himself as an enduro athlete before most North Americans knew what enduro was. The 2008 All-Mountain World Champion and 2009 Singlespeed World Champion focuses both on racing and helping promote the sport of enduro in North America.

During his World Cup downhill career, Justin Leov (NZ) established a reputation for his fitness and a keen talent on longer courses, which makes his transition to enduro a natural fit. The Kiwi will continue to represent Trek World Racing in the inaugural season of the Enduro World Series.

Heather Irmiger and Jeremy Horgan-Kobelski (US) have traded their skinsuits for sweet singletrack, shifting from their successful careers on the World Cup XC circuit to the world of adventure offered by enduro. They kicked off their US campaign with a win for Heather and 2nd for JHK (just behind Ross Schnell) in Moab at the first top of the Enduro Cup.

Trek’s enduro representation will be rounded out by the shining talents of Steffi Marth, Greg Doucende, Michele Quint, and Kathi Kuypers. With their global, multi-pronged approach, Trek will have a rider in contention for the win at every event of the 2013 Enduro World Series.

Nicolas Vouilloz – The Relentless Pursuit Of Balance – SRAM MTB Wheels

After 10 World Champion titles and 5 overall World Cup wins, Nicolas Vouilloz still wants to be and feel fast.

A different kind of fast, perhaps. While racing DH, Nico was known for his unconventional and extreme equipment choices. He is now getting ready for the first Enduro World Series season. A riding style that requires a different bike setup, a discipline where racing is spread over an entire day, with many stages and kilometers of riding. Because of these differences, gone are the days of ridiculously low spoke tension, or extreme suspension setups. Nico now makes choices based on a balance of factors such as weight, efficiency and durability. These choices allow Nico to be his fastest and a true pleasure to witness riding.

After being the most successful male mountain biker of all times, and a rally car racing champion, Nico now embarks on the next phase of his competitive life. This time, in the pursuit of balance.

Nested between deep gorges and high peaks, it’s hard to imagine the town of Peillon is only a few kilometers from Nice and the Mediterranean Sea.
A quick visit of the old town becomes an opportunity to display unearthly bike handling skills.
“Riding here, you either become good, or break yourself really bad”. Not hard to believe Nico, when rocks are flying and it’s hard to decide whether going too fast or too slow will yield the most consequences.
Peillon basks in the golden light of an early spring afternoon. When you are testing with Nico, days are long detailed.
An hour of twisty highway and a country later, we are in San Romolo. This is home to hard, long and physical DH and Enduro tracks. This is where Nico comes to decide what’s good and what’s not.
The plan mandates a tall order of runs on one of the most physical Enduro trails around. Nico rides different wheels back to back. When Nico is around, mountain biking becomes a science.
The casual look and relaxed setup might deceive to the level of precision and feedback that the session involves.
When Nico follows, it’s not easy to stay in your comfort zone. SRAM’s BlackBox program manager Jon Cancellier uses every moment to gather important feedback for Nico’s racing season.
Late in the day we move to a rough downhill trail for a final round of pictures. Nico proclaims he doesn’t feel it’s the right trail for the “little bike”, and then proceeds to make our jaws drop with his line choices and bike handling wizardry.
To win might not be Nico’s number one priority today, but he will definitely make everything in his faculty to be damn close to the top. The day hardly ends when Nico is around. Luckly, he is the one ordering the next round of beers.

 

This is Peaty 2013 – Episode 1

“What makes you bad, makes you better!”

2012 was full of highs and lows for Peaty…

Coming into the off season, he was looking for that extra edge, something to get him back on track for the up-coming season…

That edge turned out to be his beloved beard, with a serious growth even God himself would have been stoked on. With his new found ambition, he felt the urge for a sudden epic montage, taking in some of Sheffield’s finest Urban training sights, including everyone’s favorite race food, Nandos.

As you can imagine though, his wife wasn’t best pleased and the kids were starting to ask ‘where’s dad?’, so it was time to tame the beast, by heading into a classic barbers in his hometown of Sheffield.

The off-season comes and goes quicker than a wheel size and this year was no exception. Before you knew it, Peaty and the Syndicate were travelling to La Fenasosa Bike Park in Spain, to get some serious test time with Fox Suspension, setting the bikes up for the new season, whist taking in the rest of the Bike Park’s amazing trails and whipping up a storm… At least until one of them crashes hard…

Stage 3: Ingkerreke Commercial Mountain Bike Enduro

Rowena Fry makes it three from three so far at Stage 3 of the Ingkerreke Commercial Mountain Bike Enduro – a 49km single track sweetener; whilst Michael Crosbie takes his first win ahead of the Specialized-Swell duo Shaun Lewis and Andy Blair.

Michael Crossbie – On Course

The stage began at Alice Springs Telegraph Station heading out on 4WD tracks before becoming an almost continual trail of single track through some of the region’s best trails, and finishing up at Lasseters Hotel Casino.

At the half way point at the front end of the field, Lewis, Crosbie and Ben Hogarth were fanging hard together on the sweeping single tracks as Andy Blair played catch-up after being stuck with a flat tyre early on in the piece.

Blair said he didn’t panic, but just kept working it. When he came towards the end of the course at the water tower, he could see Crosbie and Lewis just one minute ahead, and was hoping to retain his yellow jersey for the overall lead; which he still holds by 1 minute and 31 seconds.

However it was Crosbie’s fine form which held off the fast finishing Lewis in second place, and Blair taking third, to cross the line first in 2:03.41.

“The plan early on in the race was to see what everyone else was doing. I was riding with my mate Kyle Ward before he had a mechanical at the 30km mark; then there was me Lewis, Hogarth and Blair just behind us.” Crosbie recounts.

“We started to tempo through the single track and Lewis and I got a gap at about the 40km mark and just kept riding away. I was lucky enough at the end to time trial through to the finish and unfortunately Lewis got a flat right near the finish.

“I’m feeling a lot better than yesterday though as I was just finding my legs; and today I was able to open it up a bit so I’m stoked,” Crosbie said.

Swell-Specialized rider Shaun Lewis is making a habit of second place, but was on the defensive today for team-mate Andy Blair due to his flat during the early stages of the race.

“The start was pretty quick with a big bunch all fighting for position. But my team mate (Blair) flatted so from there I took the more defensive role and followed everyone for a while.” Lewis said.

“When Andy wasn’t in the front group, my role is to not push the pace; giving him as much of a chance to get back in the front bunch.

“Crosbie was doing really well and took the lead so I was able to follow him; but I hit a gutter at the end resulting in a flat. But I’m happy we both got up for 2nd and 3rd and Blair retains the yellow.” Added Lewis.

In the women’s field, it was at the halfway point where in-form Rowena Fry was spotted screaming in front and having a great race, sitting 2 minutes ahead of Jenny Fay, before finishing convincingly in her third 1st place of the stage race in a time of 2:19.36.

“It was a great day today, lots and lots of single track, but pretty tough to back up after the Hill Climb and Stage 1 yesterday.” Fry said.

“Today I’m a bit better suited to the conditions on the single track than Fay, and at about a third of the way through I put the hammer down a bit to try and get a bit of a gap; whilst still looking after my legs with tomorrows big stage looming. I just kept working to the finish. It was tough!” Added Fry.

Jenny Fay felt like she chased Fry from the get-go.

“I knew I had to stay up with Row right from the beginning. We rode with each other and fought for position going into the single tracks.” Recounts Fay.

“I got a bit of a jab on one of the rocks and she (Fry) got a bit of a gap; I kept chasing and chasing her. It’s not over until the finish line so I just buried myself and raced to chase her the whole way.

“The course is a lot more technical than yesterday – it’s my nemesis. I’m much better on smoother surfaces. But I’m learning so much already this week as I want to improve technically so this stage race is where I need to be.” Fay said.

Unfortunately Target-Trek rider and yellow jersey contender Jenni King has had to pull out of the stage race due to medical reasons.

Tomorrow sees riders take on the biggest stage of the week, a point to point iconic outback 88km course from remote community Santa Teresa, through to Alice Springs. Riders will traverse a variety of beautiful and rarely accessible desert terrains and is set to test everyone’s legs.

STAGE THREE MEN

  1. Michael Crosbie                2:03.41
  2. Shaun Lewis                       2:04.32
  3. Andrew (Andy) Blair       2:04.51

STAGE THREE WOMEN

  1. Rowena Fry                        2:19.16
  2. Jenny Fay                            2:21.37
  3. Terri Rhodes                      2:30.20

OVERALL STANDINGS MEN (Total Time: Stages 1, 2 & 3)

  1. Andrew (Andy) Blair       3:32.25
  2. Shaun Lewis                       3:33.56
  3. Michael Crosbie                3:34.38

OVERALL STANDINGS WOMEN (Total Time: Stages 1, 2 & 3)

  1. Rowena Fry                        3:59.13
  2. Jenny Fay                            4:02.21
  3. Terri Rhodes                      4:17.36

Episode 3 of ‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’

Today sees the release of the third instalment of ‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’. ‘Perfect Space’ sees Danny get back on his trials bike for the first time since his career defining back operation, with a once in a lifetime opportunity to carry the Olympic torch on the streets of Glasgow.

As well as being part of one of the biggest events of 2012, which Danny says was “too big an opportunity to miss” the episode also see some significant breakthroughs regarding Danny’s most ambitious project to date as the venue for the new riding clip is finally unveiled after much searching.

Following on from a weekend watching world famous mountain bikers ‘The Athertons’ competing at the Fort William World Cup, Danny returns to Glasgow with a renewed motivation for riding and with big plans for the new film.

”I’ve got some slightly out there ideas for this project…I wanted to come up with a project where I could do anything I wanted…there are things that are borderline ridiculous.”

Fresh Product: Syntace Flatforce Stem

Australian Syntace distributor EightyOneSprices has just received some news from Syntace headquarters concerning plans for the all new Flatforce stem, a very unique design, the first of its kind, with a steerer clamp build height of only 27mm, requiring a steerer length of only 22mm min insert depth (record breaking world wide as far as we are aware!), and the bar being placed with a negative 12mm from top of headset – to date an unseen construction.


Given the company’s origin, proximity to the alps, and the majority of European customers using the stem on All Mountain bikes (such as sister company’s popular Liteville bikes) in steep terrain, the stem was originally only designed to become available in 44, 55, 66, and 77mm lengths suitable for this application where a slighty longer top tube but shorter cockpit are advantageous. However, the demand from Australia and America which lies in the use for 29er XC race hardtails for such a stem, has been heard, and Syntace are now also planning 88, 99 and 111mm lengths to cater for these markets also. These lengths are planned for availability after Eurobike 2013.

Currently, EightyOneSpices is expecting lengths 55, 66, 77mm to become available in June.

Stage One A Blast At The Ingkerreke Commercial MTB Enduro

Defending Champion Andy Blair, and six-time National Champion Rowena Fry blast around the 42km Stage 1 of the Ingkerreke Commercial MTB Enduro to take convincing wins in Alice Springs today, 13 May 2013.

Stage 1 winner Andy Blair.

The course was described by Rapid Ascent’s race director John Jacoby as ‘rude, rocky and rough’; and with the wet conditions a far cry from the hot red dust competitors were expecting, it was nothing to stop the 200 riders ready and raring for Stage 1.

The 42km course began from the Chifley Alice Springs Resort under neutral support through town, before popping out on to the western side for the beginning of the single track MTB madness.

It was stage winner Rowena Fry’s first time to Alice Springs, and despite the weather, she had a blast, finishing in 1:39.42 just four seconds ahead of Jenny Fay; with Jenni King taking third place in 1:45.19.

“Being from Tassie, the rain suits me just fine. What an awesome little stage!” Fry said.

“It was a bit of a frantic start with lots of mud and puddles; then Jenny Fay came across to me and we rode together the whole race having a blast! There’s just so much fantastic single track; and short climbs which suits us both.

“There was nothing splitting Jenny and I, but when we came into the velodrome, I was just ahead and felt a little ‘Fabian Cancellara inspiration’ and managed to pinch the win,” continued Fry.

Third placed Jenni King was all praise for Fry, and was happy with her Stage today.

“Fry is always tenacious and loves the single track. I think I rode as well as I can, but I always struggle a bit on the flat open windy bits. But the single track parts I really enjoyed, particularly the rocky parts. All up I’m very happy.” King said.

In the men’s seeded field, it was Andy Blair setting the pace early on taking out the King of the Mountain at Railway Cutting Hill which was the first steep climb of the course.

Blair appeared to have one of the cleanest bikes at the finish line, claiming to have stayed on the front so he didn’t get too much spray as riders roared down the slick and super- fast decent on the other side of Railway Cutting Hill.

Blair edged out rivals Shaun Lewis who took second place, and Ben Mather in third, with a winning time of 1:27.25.

“The wet weather was new to me today as every other year it’s been sunny.” Blair said.

“The course was quite grippy because the sand’s a bit harder in the wet, so it was really fun and you got really fast. There was heaps of single track, it was just awesome,” added Blair.

Returning to some much loved mountain biking, Wade Wallace (cyclingtips.com.au) took on Alice Springs for the first time… in his new category as a ‘veteran’ after celebrating his 40th birthday yesterday.

Wallace took out the veteran male category for Stage 1 in a steaming time of 1:36.37. Knowing his background on the road bike, it’s fair to say Wallace will be one to watch going into tonight’s Stage 2 ANZAC Hill Climb.

“I sussed everyone out in the beginning during the neutral start to work out where I’d fit in. I ended up following one of the Specialized riders and he pushed into the single track.” Wallace said.

“It was perfect conditions, nice and tacky; but with some sharp rocks hitting my pedals, I know now to be more careful for the rest of the week,” laughs Wallace.

STAGE 2, the ANZAC Hill Climb begins at 4:30pm local time (Alice Springs). Results will be posted online and via Rapid Ascent’s Twitter and Facebook accounts this evening.

Tomorrow, Tuesday 14th May, sees riders take on Stage 3, a 49km course starting out on 4WD tracks before becoming an almost continual trail of single track through some of the region’s best trails. The stage begins at Telegraph Station at 9am, before finishing up at Lasseters Hotel Casino from 11am.

STAGE ONE MEN
1. Andrew (Andy) Blair 1:27.25
2. Shaun Lewis 1:28.46
3. Ben Mather 1:28.49

STAGE ONE WOMEN
1. Rowena Fry 1:39.42
2. Jenny Fay 1:39.46
3. Jenni King 1:45.19

OVERALL STANDINGS MEN
1. Andrew (Andy) Blair 1:27.25
2. Shaun Lewis 1:28.46
3. Ben Mather 1:28.49

OVERALL STANDINGS WOMEN
1. Rowena Fry 1:39.42
2. Jenny Fay 1:39.46
3. Jenni King 1:45.19

Fresh: Bianchi, goddamn…

The Bianchi Methanol 29 FS:

Featuring the TWT (Triple Wall Tube), ERC (Embedded Reiforcement Construction), Ti-Net, ARS (Asymmetrical Rear Stays), Full Carbon Dropout and Full Carbon Link technologies.

– 100mm ERC frame 4 Bar system
– Horst link for fully independent braking
– 3 different type of unidirectional carbon fibers Toray 40T-30T-T700
– Tapered headtube
– X -12 system rear axle
– BB PressFit 30 73mm
– Full carbon dropout – post mount 160mm
– Neutral pivot positioning for no pedal kick-back
– Weight: 2230gr. (including shock)

Swell Specialized Dominate the Convict 100

After eight attempts Swell Specialized rider Shaun Lewis finally broke the hoodoo by taking out the  2013 Convict 100.

Not to be outdone was team mate Jenny Fay, returning to the event as defending champion and fresh from hervictory at the XCM National Champs in Atherton – Fay produced a clinical ride putting 10 minutes on her nearest rivals Naomi Hansen and Imogen Smith.

Jenny Fay crosses the finish in first place.
Winners are grinners. Shawn Lewis celebrates his win.

As an Irish National, Fay could not be crowned as the Australian Marathon
champ but there is little doubt that she is the leading female rider in the
XCM format: “I’m very happy to win the Convict 100 for a second year running
in the elite female category. To top it all off, Andy and Shaun showed great
teamwork to get Shaun on top of the podium in the elite male category.”In a tactical men’s race, Lewis was pushed all the way to the finish line by
24hr hard man and recently crowned XCM National Champ Jason English.

After almost getting dropped by English in the last kilometre of the race, Lewis
got the jump into the final corner and outsprinted English for the win – at
the same time setting a new course record that was held by team mate Andy
Blair in 2012. Blair carrying good form into the event played his part in
the first half of the race but was unlucky when a sidewall tear ended his
race prematurely.

In previous editions of the Convict 100, Lewis’ undoing came early in the
race in the form of the well-known (and much feared) Blue Hill – a steep
graded climb only 10.5km into the race.   Lewis explains: “In the past I
have either been dropped on the climb and never got back in contact, or I’ve
made it over with the leaders but then lost contact after going too deep.
This year I tried something different and went in an early break so that I
could get over the climb in a good position without going too deep.”

At the halfway mark the early break was pulled back and a group of seven
including Lewis, Blair, English, Johnston, Crosbie, Hall and Ward went
through the second feed station in quick succession.  Lewis and Blair hit
the next single track section at the front. Blair explains: “The next
section was the bit I was most looking forward too, you know, the bit with
all the rocky step-ups and gnarly free-ridy descents. It was actually for
this reason that Shaun and I had decided to try out our duallies for the
first time in a marathon, so I was dead keen to have fun. Unfortunately,
sometimes having fun isn’t the smartest thing to do in a race, and in this
case I made a mistake and opened up a sidewall.”

Blair’s unfortunate run-in with the rocky terrain signalled an opportunity
for English who went straight to the front and at the 75km it was English,
Lewis, Johnson and Crosbie left to fight it out for podium positions.

In the end Lewis’ showed the same sprinting form that won him the 2012 Wombat
100 title over Adrian Jackson, saluting the crowd as he took line honours in
the 2013 Convict 100.

Mens podium (L-R) – English, Lewis, Johnston.

Matt Jones – Turn A Page

Matt Jones is having a great 2013.

The contest season is barely underway and already this young talent is making a name for himself, whether that’s by winning the qualifications round at Vienna Air King (his first FMB contest), then coming 10th in the finals, or busting out double backflips and a whole amount of style in photos and on videos both at home and abroad.

2013 IMBA Australasian Summit, Oct 14 – 17

IMBA Australia is proud to announce that we are hosting and organising a regional trails summit for the Asia Pacific Region in Tropical Far North Queensland, at the Cairns Convention Centre.

This year’s Regional Summit is a chance for celebrating trail development and access for mountain bike riders in our part of the globe as well as to learn about cutting edge trail developments and solutions from NZ, Singapore, Hong Kong and Australia to name a few. We are seeking attendance from all those who are involved in mountain bike trail provision in your homeland or aboard. We want you to be involved. It will be inaugural event or a biennial regional trails summit that aims to guide the future of trail development and set high standards for the provision of MTB tourism.

Together we can help all communities, big or small, to create world class MTB experiences for health, happiness and enhanced visitation. So, the call is out. We are seeking, land managers, bike industry reps, trail builders, regional planners and mountain bike trail advocates to be part of this inspiring and knowledge sharing event. We are bringing the fun format of the IMBA World Summit to you, so don’t miss out!

As part of the Summit we are planning rides at Smithfield MTB Park, Kuranda’s DH Track and the brand new trails in the Tablelands at Atherton and Mareeba. The trails and scenery will astound you!

Stay tuned for updates and further speaker announcements!

For more information about the event, and to register please click here.

Do you have something to say?

Naturally to develop a full and extensive program, with content focussed on contemporary and innovative mountain bike projects or programs, we want to hear from all corners of the Asia Pacific Region. If you are working on something special, or have new trail research to share, we encourage you to consider making a presentation. Breakout sessions are still available so if you would like to present at this year’s summit please contact Nick Bowman – [email protected]

Why I Ride

“Why I Ride” is a short motivational film about Axel Brunst a passionate Mountain bike rider from Stuttgart.

Actually he is really into Actionsports-Photography but this time he is in front of the lens and tells us his motivation for his sport…

Trek World Racing Stories – Episode 0.1

Today Trek World Racing is releasing the first episode of its new video series, entitled TREK WORLD RACING STORIES.

The first episode is a new beginning for the team and we catch up with Brook MacDonald, Neko Mulally and Greg Williamson as the they encounter the notoriously flat race course at the Sea Otter Classic in California. Brook breaks out the flat pedals, Neko impresses on his 26 inch World Cup DH Bike, the Session 9.9, and Greg is styling it up, wide eyed, and enjoying his first official race with the team. Sea Otter offers a lot more than racing as the team took time to visit with sponsors, media and also enjoy the amazing Monterey Aquarium.

This is Peaty 2013 – Season 2 Trailer

Fuelled by Monster Energy, “This Is Peaty” Season 2 is upon us…

2012 was a tough year for Peaty, plagued with injuries, mechanicals and some plain bad luck. On the bike, things may have not gone to plan, but as you all saw, off the bike there was no lack in pace and success, travelling up and down the globe catching up with all you Peaty fans.

Season 2 is going to bring you closer to Peaty than ever before, with plenty of carnage both on and off the bike, with Kathy, Bryceland, Minnaar and the rest of the usual suspects, travelling the globe taking in the UCI World Cup series, California, Thailand, Spain, The Isle of Man TT and maybe even a special Ratboy episode?! Along with much, much more.

As you can see in the Trailer, things have already been pretty hectic and the season hasn’t even started yet! To fit it all in, we’re going to be bringing you 8 episodes, dropping every 4 weeks, from now until December to keep you entertained all year long.

Sit back and crack a beer, Peaty’s here.

Supported by:

–       Birzman Tools
–       Five Ten
–       Santa Cruz Bicycles
–       Smuggling Duds
–       Drift Innovation Helmet Cams

Follow us:

www.ThisisPeaty.com

@ThisIsPeaty

Gravity Enduro South Australia – Round 1, 14th April

The first ever South Australian Gravity Enduro took place on 14 April at the new Craigburn Farm trails in Sturt Gorge recreation Park, and was a massive success.

The development of Gravity Enduro in SA came about after a group of riders, lead by Daniel Morgan and Kyle Stevens, got together to try to bring the new concept to SA. After a few discussions and meetings, the Adelaide Mountain Bike Club agreed to support this new group by allowing them to set up and run the races under their banner, which streamlined much organisation, and the committee could instead focus on the job of just running a great event.

Jaclyn Schapel- 1st place in Elite women.

As a first venue for this type of competition the trails of Craigburn Farm made perfect sense, as the trails are popular with riders and offer a good selection of mild to hard downhill trails, with plenty of jumps and obstacles to challenge the faster riders, but newer or less confident riders could still race the slower lines and experience the new style of racing, so it suited all levels.

There was a huge amount of interest in the run up to the event, with all 110 spots selling out a good week before the event- 150 or more spots could have been sold, which is pretty big for Adelaide. For a first event this was a huge surprise for the organisers!

The race used all of the original Craigburn Fram trail network, with the first stage kicking off from the main trailhead, and heading down the undulating terrain of Sidewinder right. This turned out to be one of the most critical stages, with a 45 second climb (for the fast ones) in the middle of the stage taking it’s toll on the less fit, or those who chose a less than suitable bike. Stage 1 then finished with a second descent down the more xc-styled Little River trail.

Ruben Spranz, 2nd in Under 15.

A short breather and a relaxed climb then brought riders to probably the most popular stage of the route, Craigberms- this is a favourite with riders, with a few table tops, a loads of jumps and berms, and a few other obstacles thrown in the mix. Times were much closer on this leg, although the final flat finish did catch a few out.

After another gentle climb past the Craigburn lake, the third stage was probably the most technical, down ‘Sticks and Stones’. This is a totally different trail, with a number of tricky rock gardens in the upper section, some of which require a good bit of pedalling and line choice to get through cleanly, and with the occasional uphill pinch. This was another stage which split the fields more, proving you needed to be a good all-rounder to really nail the event.

Tim Schiller, racing hard in the sports men category.

Riders then had a chance for a quick break as they passed through the event village, before heading on down to “cowbones’ for stage 4, and then a short wait until the final stage, ‘Sidewinder left’ opened up- it had been the first climb of the day, so it was pretty cool to then reverse this trail and race it!

In the elite men, Mitcham Cycles’ Nathan Moris proved his multiple Strava KOM’s weren’t just a fluke, narrowly beating Andrew Clarke by 6 seconds to win in a total of 13 minutes straight. In the Women LivGiant rider Jaclyn Schapel beat Torq rider Sarah Holmes’ hardtail by 19 seconds to finish in 14:40- an overall position of 22nd.

Nathan Morris, 1st Elite Men and first overall

So, now attention moves to Eagle MTB park, which will host round 2 on June 2nd, which promises more technical and raw riding. Entries are already open and going fast, so get in early to avoid missing your spot. For more info go to http://gravityendurosa.com.au

Results:-

Elite Men

1st: Nathan Morris – 13:00
2nd: Andrew Clarke – 13:06
3rd: Samuel Hardie – FSR Industries – 13:28

Elite Women:-

1st: Jaclyn Schapel – LivGiant Aus, 4Shaw agencies, Adidas eyewear – 14:40
2nd: Sarah Holmes – Torq Nutrition – 14:59
3rd: Anna Puckridge – 15:30

Expert:-

1st: Brad Parr -14:07
2nd: Kain Gardner – 14:13
3rd: Adam Wood – 14:18

Sport Men

1st: Darius Kubilius – 14:56
2nd: Reece Taylor – 15:05
3rd: Jeff Hughes – 15:20

Sport Women

1st: Nicole Chaffey – Upfront Bikes – 18:10
2nd: Sue Ann Woodwise – 18:49
3rd: Melanie Malig – 20:40

Under 19

1st: Curtis Dowdell – 13:23
2nd: Michael Denton – 14:58
3rd: Cody Barker – 15:09

Under 15

1st: Jasper Dowdell – 15:11
2nd: Ruben Spranz – B.-d Farm Paris Creek -15:29
3rd: Griff Knight – 29:09

Trail Fund NZ Launches

Trail Fund NZ is a not-for-profit organisation that has been set up in 2013 to help fund the development and maintenance of trails all around New Zealand.

It appears the land of perfect singletrack needs more of it because the goal for Trail Fund NZ is to raise awareness and support for trail building among the wider community, such as businesses, councils, community groups, and other public bodies.

One of the group’s ambassadors is XC Olympian turned enduro racer, Rosara Joseph. The well-liked racer hoped the national body, with proper governance structures and an identifiable brand, would be able to access funding from a wide range of organisations.

“We also want to share knowledge and experience about best practice for trail building and advocacy,” she said.

Rosara Joseph on the Deliverance Trail
Olympian Rosara Joseph above the Deliverance Trail in Wellington, New Zealand

Trail Fund NZ expects everyone to benefit from more trail networks of a higher standard along with an increased awareness of advocacy for mountain biking and the development of trails.

“Mountain biking is hugely popular in New Zealand and is continuing to grow, but it is unique in that we largely build and maintain our own facilities,” Rosara offers.

“We want to build not just sustainably-built trails, but awareness and recognition that deserves to go with them.”

Rosara has raced throughout Europe and North America and lived in the UK for a period of five years and she believes New Zealand has a unique mountain biking proposition.

“I enjoyed some fantastic trails in all of those places. However, I think that New Zealand is special in that trail building, and mountain biking in general, has widespread community and political support. That’s a big difference compared with, for example, the UK (where I spent nearly five years), where mountain biking and the building of mountain bike trails are both really difficult to get support for. I think New Zealand is also unique in that the past 10 years or so has seen an explosion of purpose-built mountain biking trails throughout the country.”

She said New Zealand riders were also very lucky to have great trails so close to and amongst the cities and towns.

“I doubt there are many capital cities where you can commute nearly right to your office via off road trails! In contrast to the established tracks in Europe and the US, many of which are existing hiking tracks that become shared tracks, many of the trails we ride here in NZ are purpose-built mountain bike trails. So, in a sense, I think most mountain bikers in NZ have more awareness of the time and effort that has gone into building the trails they ride on.”

Want to get involved in Trail Fund NZ? Visit trailfund.org.nz to buy a cool t-shirt, donate some money to the fund, apply for a grant to contribute to a trail building project you’re involved in and, of course, you can dig.

For Rosara, who is about to jump on a plane to begin her season racing and riding in Oregon and Colorado, with a couple of trips to Whistler, BC, and Utah also planned, the decision to support Trail Fund NZ was simple:

“I love mountain biking,” she smiles. “I hugely appreciate the efforts of those who have dedicated time and energy to building and maintaining the tracks that I ride, and I thought that helping out with Trail Fund NZ is one way I can support their stellar efforts.”

Singletrack perfection
The kind of singletrack perfection that Trail Fund NZ hopes to create more of throughout New Zealand.
Hamish Seaton cobblestones
Hamish Seaton places a stone in a cobbled section of trail.
Trail builder Gareth Hargreaves rips into a piece of trail on Snakes and Ladders in Dunedin.