FRESH PRODUCT: SRAM X01, 11 SPEED FOR THE MASSES

SRAM’s highly anticipated price option drivetrain, X01 has been trickling out on new bikes over the last weeks. Note that this is the OEM (not available to buy aftermarket) spec drivetrain only that will be found on new 2014 models, with the SRAM X01 arriving to our shores around September.

Technology trickle-down to lower price points, at its best.
Technology trickle-down to lower price points, at its best. 220g.
Eleven speed chain, without the hollow links to save on manufacturing costs.
Eleven speed chain, without the hollow links to save on manufacturing costs.

SRAM could not have dreamed of a better reception to their single ring, 11-speed drivetrain. It has gone on to become the most desirable bit of gear around. SRAM hinted of trickle-down technology to cheaper price points, and here is the first to come out of the SRAM lair.

OEM spec, a black coloured cassette, very stealth.
OEM spec, a black coloured cassette, very stealth. 275g.
The X0 shifter gets one more click to X01. No carbon means many less dollars.
The X0 shifter gets one more click to X01. No carbon means many less dollars.

What appears to be using less carbon materials in the crank arms and shifters, and a less machining intensive cassette manufacturing process, X01 is remarkably similar to XX1 in every way.

800g w/bottom bracket - plus a smaller diameter bolt mounting, for the low range 30 tooth chainring.
800g w/bottom bracket – plus a smaller diameter bolt mounting for the low range 30 tooth chainring.
Alternating jockey wheel teeth, for chain security.
Alternating jockey wheel teeth, for chain security.

Flow's First Bite: Scott Spark 700

Scott have taken the big, bold step forward and for 2014 we will see no more 26″ bikes in the Scott Scale, Spark and Genius ranges. More interestingly is that Scott are now offering a choice of 29″ and 27.5″ wheel sizes with the Spark (120mm travel dual suspension) and Scale (hardtail) with 26” bikes becoming a rarity. Is it a good thing?

WEB_Firstbite_ScottSpark7000042
Absolutely LOVE this bike!

On a two-hour head spinning, lung-burning ride with Nino Schurter and Florian Vogel, Flow was having an absolute blast aboard the Scale 700, with 27.5″ wheels and the biggest surprise for us – a FOX rear shock. The bike we rode was about as premium as it gets, with Syncros carbon wheels, XTR brakes, XX1 drivetrain and Schwalbe tyres.

WEB_Firstbite_ScottSpark7000032

Retaining everything of what makes the Spark an amazing bike for marathon races, cross country rides and speedy trail hooning, Scott have stepped it up by moving from DT Swiss to FOX for 2014 across their entire range. This was not only a massive surprise to us, everyone attending the launch was really quite blown away by the decision to shift away from the Swiss suspension brand that has been so very close with Scott for many years. FOX have been developing suspension damping systems for much longer than DT Swiss and are moving faster each year with developing industry leading rear shocks. Proprietary suspension is a concern to some consumers, but the FOX Nude shock uses standard parts, and all the serviceable items of the shock are identical to all FOX rear shocks.

Chapeau Scott! FOX Nude shocks are on the Genius and Spark for 2014, and we could not be happier.
Chapeau Scott! FOX Nude cTCd shocks are on the Genius, Genius LT and Spark for 2014, and we could not be happier.

Scott’s well known and well loved travel/geometry adjustment system – Twinloc is integrated nicely into the new FOX Nude cTCd shocks, with the three primary modes staying the same as in previous models. But with a spring curve, sensitivity and balanced feel far above what was capable with the DT Swiss Nude shocks of the past. Choose between open mode, traction mode and locked out.

Self proclaimed carbon experts, Scott are the makers of category leading lightweight frames. 1.9kg frame with shock and hardware, that is very impressive!
Self proclaimed carbon experts, Scott are the makers of category leading lightweight frames. 1.9kg frame with shock and hardware, that is very impressive!

Why would they choose 27.5″ wheel sizes then? Well, it comes down to height of the rider, and style of the rider also. Scott can make a lighter and stiffer bike in the smaller wheels, with less construction restraint challenges that come along with the 29ers. The wheels are also lighter, of course in the smaller diameter, so the bikes acceleration properties are simply outstanding with 27.5”. 29” is still the best option for many riders, with the bigger wheel giving great traction and stability on the more open trails, whilst the 27.5” will appeal to shorter riders or those who play with the tighter, twistier trails a little more.

The Spark uses a low bottom bracket to boost it's cornering performance, but also offer adjustability to lift it up a notch if clearance between the ground and cranks were a problem to some rider and terrain.
The Spark uses a low bottom bracket to boost it’s cornering performance, but also offer adjustability to lift it up a notch if clearance between the ground and cranks were a problem.
We love this guy! World Champion, and so friendly. Riding behind Nino is an honour, and an incredible show of speed and talent. Nino brought his Cape Epic Spark along for the ride.
We love this guy! World Champion, and so friendly. Riding behind Nino is an honour, and an incredible show of speed and talent. Nino brought his Cape Epic Spark along for the ride.

Our time aboard the bike was a real pleasure. Of course a bike so light is an advantage, but the low weight didn’t come with any negative traits, at all. The balanced suspension feel is superb, and when the trails became unpredictable and rough, we held our confidence high and pushed the limits without any problem. Hitting the Twinloc lever constantly, we climbed with the upmost efficiency and would be able to quickly engage the mode to suit the terrain without any effort; the thumb actuation of the lever is so easy.

With the addition of two cables running to the fork and shock from the handlebar, Scott have mastered the art of neat cable routing, and appears very clean.
With the addition of two cables running to the fork and shock from the handlebar, Scott have mastered the art of neat cable routing, and appears very clean.

Both the 27.5” and 29” Sparks will be available in Australia, we feel that the option may confuse some people, but it really makes sense and can’t wait to get them on home soil for a complete review soon!

Scott acquired the long serving component manufacturer - Syncros, and we saw a huge lineup from wheels to components. The high end carbon offerings are very tidy, and ergonomic.
Scott acquired the long serving component manufacturer – Syncros, and we saw a huge lineup from wheels to components. The high end carbon offerings are very tidy, and ergonomic.

 

Flow’s First Bite: Scott Spark 700

Scott have taken the big, bold step forward and for 2014 we will see no more 26″ bikes in the Scott Scale, Spark and Genius ranges. More interestingly is that Scott are now offering a choice of 29″ and 27.5″ wheel sizes with the Spark (120mm travel dual suspension) and Scale (hardtail) with 26” bikes becoming a rarity. Is it a good thing?

WEB_Firstbite_ScottSpark7000042
Absolutely LOVE this bike!

On a two-hour head spinning, lung-burning ride with Nino Schurter and Florian Vogel, Flow was having an absolute blast aboard the Scale 700, with 27.5″ wheels and the biggest surprise for us – a FOX rear shock. The bike we rode was about as premium as it gets, with Syncros carbon wheels, XTR brakes, XX1 drivetrain and Schwalbe tyres.

WEB_Firstbite_ScottSpark7000032

Retaining everything of what makes the Spark an amazing bike for marathon races, cross country rides and speedy trail hooning, Scott have stepped it up by moving from DT Swiss to FOX for 2014 across their entire range. This was not only a massive surprise to us, everyone attending the launch was really quite blown away by the decision to shift away from the Swiss suspension brand that has been so very close with Scott for many years. FOX have been developing suspension damping systems for much longer than DT Swiss and are moving faster each year with developing industry leading rear shocks. Proprietary suspension is a concern to some consumers, but the FOX Nude shock uses standard parts, and all the serviceable items of the shock are identical to all FOX rear shocks.

Chapeau Scott! FOX Nude shocks are on the Genius and Spark for 2014, and we could not be happier.
Chapeau Scott! FOX Nude cTCd shocks are on the Genius, Genius LT and Spark for 2014, and we could not be happier.

Scott’s well known and well loved travel/geometry adjustment system – Twinloc is integrated nicely into the new FOX Nude cTCd shocks, with the three primary modes staying the same as in previous models. But with a spring curve, sensitivity and balanced feel far above what was capable with the DT Swiss Nude shocks of the past. Choose between open mode, traction mode and locked out.

Self proclaimed carbon experts, Scott are the makers of category leading lightweight frames. 1.9kg frame with shock and hardware, that is very impressive!
Self proclaimed carbon experts, Scott are the makers of category leading lightweight frames. 1.9kg frame with shock and hardware, that is very impressive!

Why would they choose 27.5″ wheel sizes then? Well, it comes down to height of the rider, and style of the rider also. Scott can make a lighter and stiffer bike in the smaller wheels, with less construction restraint challenges that come along with the 29ers. The wheels are also lighter, of course in the smaller diameter, so the bikes acceleration properties are simply outstanding with 27.5”. 29” is still the best option for many riders, with the bigger wheel giving great traction and stability on the more open trails, whilst the 27.5” will appeal to shorter riders or those who play with the tighter, twistier trails a little more.

The Spark uses a low bottom bracket to boost it's cornering performance, but also offer adjustability to lift it up a notch if clearance between the ground and cranks were a problem to some rider and terrain.
The Spark uses a low bottom bracket to boost it’s cornering performance, but also offer adjustability to lift it up a notch if clearance between the ground and cranks were a problem.
We love this guy! World Champion, and so friendly. Riding behind Nino is an honour, and an incredible show of speed and talent. Nino brought his Cape Epic Spark along for the ride.
We love this guy! World Champion, and so friendly. Riding behind Nino is an honour, and an incredible show of speed and talent. Nino brought his Cape Epic Spark along for the ride.

Our time aboard the bike was a real pleasure. Of course a bike so light is an advantage, but the low weight didn’t come with any negative traits, at all. The balanced suspension feel is superb, and when the trails became unpredictable and rough, we held our confidence high and pushed the limits without any problem. Hitting the Twinloc lever constantly, we climbed with the upmost efficiency and would be able to quickly engage the mode to suit the terrain without any effort; the thumb actuation of the lever is so easy.

With the addition of two cables running to the fork and shock from the handlebar, Scott have mastered the art of neat cable routing, and appears very clean.
With the addition of two cables running to the fork and shock from the handlebar, Scott have mastered the art of neat cable routing, and appears very clean.

Both the 27.5” and 29” Sparks will be available in Australia, we feel that the option may confuse some people, but it really makes sense and can’t wait to get them on home soil for a complete review soon!

Scott acquired the long serving component manufacturer - Syncros, and we saw a huge lineup from wheels to components. The high end carbon offerings are very tidy, and ergonomic.
Scott acquired the long serving component manufacturer – Syncros, and we saw a huge lineup from wheels to components. The high end carbon offerings are very tidy, and ergonomic.

 

Video: Bali Rides

I’ve been around a bit for various types of ‘adventure’ trips, sometimes guided, sometimes not. Every once in a long while, I’m lucky enough to find a top-class guide. Ramang Kristian from Bali Rides is one of those guides. Needless to say, we had a great trip. The rides were great, transport and accommodation more than comfortable, and we were well taken care of with plenty of snacks and drinks. Ramang showed us the riding around Bali the way only a local can, with hidden singletrack and bits of local culture and sights thrown in….

Video: AVID Chasing Trail | Kenny Smith

Kenny Smith does things on a mountain bike that no one else does. He finds possibilities in places where no one else even looks. Bigger, steeper, faster—that’s his style.

By Kenny’s own estimation, a lack of fear is both his biggest strength and his biggest weakness. There have been times when he has paid the price—but that drive to push things further makes him one of the most electrifying riders to watch. On his home trails in Whistler, British Columbia, he loves inventing creative new ways to ride the same trails.

Kenny is particular about how his brakes perform. He has to be. To pull this off, it takes trust—in himself and in his equipment. When he’s teetering on the edge of a cliff and getting ready to drop a new line, he knows exactly how his Avid brakes will perform. Powerful, smooth, trustworthy.

Video: AVID Chasing Trail | Kenny Smith

Kenny Smith does things on a mountain bike that no one else does. He finds possibilities in places where no one else even looks. Bigger, steeper, faster—that’s his style.

By Kenny’s own estimation, a lack of fear is both his biggest strength and his biggest weakness. There have been times when he has paid the price—but that drive to push things further makes him one of the most electrifying riders to watch. On his home trails in Whistler, British Columbia, he loves inventing creative new ways to ride the same trails.

Kenny is particular about how his brakes perform. He has to be. To pull this off, it takes trust—in himself and in his equipment. When he’s teetering on the edge of a cliff and getting ready to drop a new line, he knows exactly how his Avid brakes will perform. Powerful, smooth, trustworthy.

Things Are Heating Up At Trek World Racing

During the recent opening round of the UCI Mountain Bike World Cup in Fort William, Trek World Racing unveiled the latest tool the team will have on hand for their riders in the 2013 season. The TWR HotBox as pictured is essentially a bike warmer for use at the top of the mountain prior to race start.

Picture 12

In a similar vein to the systems used in motor sports to have various components of their race machines at optimum temperature in race conditions, the team studied various scenarios and compiled data pertaining to the performance of the Session 9.9 in cold conditions and determined that heating the bikes to a particular temperature would allow the rider to have the bike feeling responsive immediately from the get go, supple over the initial hits and read for the first heavy compressions with complete traction. This has an impact on suspension, hydraulics and some tire compounds.

Designed by 23 Degrees Sports for the Trek World Racing team, the HotBox is totally portable and can be easily taken to the top of the mountain by chairlift and/or gondola, and erected in less than 10 minutes. The team will have the HotBox on hand for key races later in the year, namely in Norway and Leogang, where they’ll be used should the ambient temperature at the top of the mountain fall below a pre-determined number.

Team Owner Martin Whiteley commented: “We’ve had races where the temperatures at the start house were down as low as 5 degrees Celsius, and there is clear evidence that the bikes and technology we run now are simply not operating as they should in these conditions for up to 4 major compressions. There’ll be some who think this is going too far, but there are those who said that in motor-sport some time ago and now it’s the norm. I spend a lot of time around motor-sport and the advice and information I’ve been given has been very helpful in arriving at the current design of the HotBox and the various temperature parameters we used both in heating, and start mode. I’m keen for the riders to use it now in race conditions”.

 

 

Fresh Product: Finish Line Max Suspension Spray

Whether it is an old bike hidden in the basement or the latest full suspension rig, every mountain biker wants their suspension to work at its peak potential. Max Suspension Spray is a pro-grade stiction- fighting stanchion lubricant designed to maximize the performance of your suspension!

Over time, stanchions become dry and dirty, causing the fork to stiffen up, become noisy and lose travel. Max smoothes, quiets, and improves the performance of old and new forks even those with coated stanchions. Use Max before rides to ensure maximum responsiveness over the smallest of bumps, and the longest possible travel over extreme terrain. Use Max to break in new forks or bring old ones back to life!

Max Suspension Spray will:

  • Eliminate stiction and quiet noisy forks
  • Condition and protect rubber seals and O-rings
  • Improve the surface slip of coated stanchions.

Simply spray a light coat of Max on stanchions to keep your bike race-ready.

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup: 2014 Calendar Unveiled

The International Cycling Union has today published the calendar for the 2014 UCI Mountain Bike World Cup presented by Shimano.

Approved by the UCI Mountain Bike Commission but subject to approval by the UCI Management Committee, the 2014 calendar will comprise nine rounds in nine different countries.

Two new World Cup destinations in 2014 are Cairns, Australia, and Méribel in France, both hosting a triple event (Olympic Cross-country, Cross-country Eliminator and Downhill). The second round in Cairns will prepare the way for the 2017 UCI Mountain Bike & Trials World Championships, which have also been awarded to the “Tropical North Queensland.”

Méribel will provide the stage for the final round of the UCI Mountain Bike World Cup (August 23 – 24). It will be the last chance for the athletes to confront each other before the World Championships which will get under way in Hafjell, Norway, 10 days later.

After a successful debut in 2013, Albstadt (Germany) features on the calendar for the second time with Olympic cross-country and Cross-country Eliminator competitions. Meanwhile Windham (USA) returns after a one-year absence with a triple event.

 

2014 UCI Mountain Bike World Cup presented by Shimano

Evenement Date  Lieu*
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE/DHI Round 1 05-06 April    Pietermaritzburg (RSA)
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE/DHI Round 2 26-27 April   Cairns (AUS)
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE Round 3 24-25 May   Nove Mesto na Morave (CZE)
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE Round 4 31 May – 01 June  Albstadt (GER)
UCI World Cup DHI Round 3 07-08 June  Fort William (GBR)
UCI World Cup DHI Round 4 14-15 June  Leogang (AUT)
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE/DHI Round 5 02-03 August  Mont-Sainte-Anne (CAN)
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE/DHI Round 6 09-10 August  Windham (USA)
UCI World Cup XCO/XCE/DHI Round 7 23-24 August  Méribel (FRA)

 

*Subject to the approval of the UCI Management Committee

SURVEY: Warburton Mountain Bike Feasibility Study

World Trail is currently undertaking a study for Yarra Ranges Council, looking at the feasibility of developing a network of mountain biking trails in the township of Warburton, Victoria. The underlying motivation for this project is the need to increase tourism visitation to Warburton that will in turn provide an economic stimulus to the local economy.

As part of this project, World Trail is seeking input from the community, especially the cycling and mountain biking communities. We have designed a survey that seeks to understand the habits of mountain bikers, their travel and spending preferences and tests the likelihood of people visiting Warburton once the trails have been constructed. This survey can be found  here:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/WarburtonMountainBikeFeasibilitySurvey2013

This survey should take less than 10 minutes to complete. Your assistance in completing this survey is greatly appreciated and will provide valuable information that will help to guide the Yarra Ranges Council and potentially shape the future of Warburton.

The closing time for the survey is 11pm on Sunday 7th July 2013.

For more information contact Ben Bainbridge, Executive Officer Recreation Services for Yarra Ranges Council on (03) 9294 6758

Flow's First Bite: GT Sensor 27.5 – First Ride

GT have just completed the launch of the 2014 GT Sensor and Force 27.5 bikes at Deer Valley, USA. Flow was there to see them unwrapped to the world media, but more importantly, we were there to ride them. After a solid day on the trails these are our first thoughts.

Our test rig, the Sensor Carbon Pro.

They say first impressions count and the GT Sensor scored high points straight up. When it was wheeled out from behind the big black curtains at the Deer Valley launch, we immediately fell in love with how good the bike looked. The paint, the shape, the angles, and the design all married to make a damn good looking bike. We were also super stoked to see a new bike, not just a re-paint of the previous year’s model.

The 130mm 27.5 (650B) Sensor is, to use GTs words, “designed for the aggressive trail rider, who is out ripping single-track and occasionally testing their racing skills while drinking their way through an 24 hour race. You don’t want to compromise on climbing or descending ability, and want a crisp, efficient pedaling platform.” That is a whole lot of marketing food to consume, but basically we feel it’s a perfect bike for most people’s riding.

GT have gone to great lengths to completely redesign the Sensor for the new wheel size, and compared to the old it’s worlds apart. In fact, the Sensor (and the Force) have been over two years in the making with several iterations of tests bikes being built, ridden, and sent back for re-design. The biggest differences we first noticed are the angles, lengths, and suspension design. The new breed of GTs, including the Sensor, are now lower and slacker (see illustration below). They have also been lengthened in the top tube and come standard with shorter stems (80mm on the sensor). The theory behind both the angles and cockpit changes it to make a more aggressive bike that allows you to sit “within” the bike.

Comparison with the old Sensor. (The 2014 is in yellow.)  You can easily see how different the old and new frames with the bottom bracket drop is substantial.
2014 GT Sensor geometry (click on me to make me bigger).

The suspension has also gone through a very substantial change and is now termed Angle Optimised Suspension. The AOS utilises a high single pivot combined with the new GT Path Link. The function of the Path Link in a nutshell: to allow for the use of a high single pivot to achieve a rearward arcing wheelpath, provide the same pedaling performance as the traditional I-Drive, control chain growth, and minimise pedal feedback. We will explain this in more detail when we do a full review, but basically the Path Link moves the bottom bracket in the same rearward direction as the wheel arc, reducing chain growth and feedback normally associated with high pivots.

The new AOS with the Path Link.

After being impressed with the physical and technical aspects of the bike, would we be impressed with how it rode? Yes, we were impressed. The first thing we noticed was how stiff the rear of the bike was and how playful it felt. If we were blindfolded we wouldn’t have been able to tell the bike was a 27.5″ as it manualed, cornered, and felt very much like a 26″. Also, we noticed only very minimal pedal feedback and a very active suspension feel.

With most of the bike’s mass very low the Sensor was able to transition between left and right turns very quickly with no feeling of delay in that transition. The FOX front and rear shocks worked well and we liked how the rear ramped up and eliminated hard bottoming out. The Sensor felt quick out of corners and accelerated easily. A good bike for a trail with many, many corners.

Were there any negatives? As we were riding on unfamiliar terrain and had no reference it was too hard to tell if the Sensor’s bigger wheel size made any difference rolling over rocks and roots. The theory does indicate that it should, but only testing on our local trails will answer that question. Also, as the rear of the bike was so stiff, it kind of felt funny to have a 32mm fork matched with the the rear feeling stiffer than the front.

As soon as we get our hands on one in Australia we will give the bike a full test. So far we love it and testing on our local trails will add more to the story.

The highlights of our test bike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flow’s First Bite: GT Sensor 27.5 – First Ride

GT have just completed the launch of the 2014 GT Sensor and Force 27.5 bikes at Deer Valley, USA. Flow was there to see them unwrapped to the world media, but more importantly, we were there to ride them. After a solid day on the trails these are our first thoughts.

Our test rig, the Sensor Carbon Pro.

They say first impressions count and the GT Sensor scored high points straight up. When it was wheeled out from behind the big black curtains at the Deer Valley launch, we immediately fell in love with how good the bike looked. The paint, the shape, the angles, and the design all married to make a damn good looking bike. We were also super stoked to see a new bike, not just a re-paint of the previous year’s model.

The 130mm 27.5 (650B) Sensor is, to use GTs words, “designed for the aggressive trail rider, who is out ripping single-track and occasionally testing their racing skills while drinking their way through an 24 hour race. You don’t want to compromise on climbing or descending ability, and want a crisp, efficient pedaling platform.” That is a whole lot of marketing food to consume, but basically we feel it’s a perfect bike for most people’s riding.

GT have gone to great lengths to completely redesign the Sensor for the new wheel size, and compared to the old it’s worlds apart. In fact, the Sensor (and the Force) have been over two years in the making with several iterations of tests bikes being built, ridden, and sent back for re-design. The biggest differences we first noticed are the angles, lengths, and suspension design. The new breed of GTs, including the Sensor, are now lower and slacker (see illustration below). They have also been lengthened in the top tube and come standard with shorter stems (80mm on the sensor). The theory behind both the angles and cockpit changes it to make a more aggressive bike that allows you to sit “within” the bike.

Comparison with the old Sensor. (The 2014 is in yellow.)  You can easily see how different the old and new frames with the bottom bracket drop is substantial.
2014 GT Sensor geometry (click on me to make me bigger).

The suspension has also gone through a very substantial change and is now termed Angle Optimised Suspension. The AOS utilises a high single pivot combined with the new GT Path Link. The function of the Path Link in a nutshell: to allow for the use of a high single pivot to achieve a rearward arcing wheelpath, provide the same pedaling performance as the traditional I-Drive, control chain growth, and minimise pedal feedback. We will explain this in more detail when we do a full review, but basically the Path Link moves the bottom bracket in the same rearward direction as the wheel arc, reducing chain growth and feedback normally associated with high pivots.

The new AOS with the Path Link.

After being impressed with the physical and technical aspects of the bike, would we be impressed with how it rode? Yes, we were impressed. The first thing we noticed was how stiff the rear of the bike was and how playful it felt. If we were blindfolded we wouldn’t have been able to tell the bike was a 27.5″ as it manualed, cornered, and felt very much like a 26″. Also, we noticed only very minimal pedal feedback and a very active suspension feel.

With most of the bike’s mass very low the Sensor was able to transition between left and right turns very quickly with no feeling of delay in that transition. The FOX front and rear shocks worked well and we liked how the rear ramped up and eliminated hard bottoming out. The Sensor felt quick out of corners and accelerated easily. A good bike for a trail with many, many corners.

Were there any negatives? As we were riding on unfamiliar terrain and had no reference it was too hard to tell if the Sensor’s bigger wheel size made any difference rolling over rocks and roots. The theory does indicate that it should, but only testing on our local trails will answer that question. Also, as the rear of the bike was so stiff, it kind of felt funny to have a 32mm fork matched with the the rear feeling stiffer than the front.

As soon as we get our hands on one in Australia we will give the bike a full test. So far we love it and testing on our local trails will add more to the story.

The highlights of our test bike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’: Enter the Creative Mind of Danny MacAskill

The long wait was worth it: Today Danny MacAskill’s most ambitious project is finally released. The much anticipated ‘Imaginate‘ riding clip is a gateway into Danny’s mind and gives us a glimpse of Danny’s childhood imaginations. Filmed at an especially designed film set, Danny shows-off incredible new tricks using extraordinary features.

‘MacAskill’s Imaginate‘ tells little Daniel’s story: sitting on the floor in his childhood bedroom on the tiny island Isle of Skye, little Daniel is playing with his miniature bike toy. Cut! Next scene, over a decade later: Danny’s childhood dream becomes a reality! The globally renowned YouTube phenomenon, who has now had more than 65 million views from all three of his previous edits, was given the chance to create his own playground in Kelvin Hall, the former Museum of Transport in Glasgow.

Despite numerous setbacks due to his injured spine, the Scotsman reached a never seen before riding level. The result: a seven-minute jaw-dropping clip! Danny’s gravity defying tricks in a gigantic dream-like set-up, make ‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’ the eye-catcher clip of the year! Doing front flips over F1-cars and tailwhips from the barrel of a tank are only some funky features of this unconventional edit.

After two years of preparations and filming, the ‘Imaginate’ project is probably Danny’s most remarkable achievement. As part of the Imaginate web series, we have been following Danny’s fantastic career, from his first YouTube-hit ‘Inspired Bicycles’ up to today’s ‘Imaginate’. Now the time has come to be blown-away by Danny’s final edit. But as we know the down-to-earth Scotsman is not particularly effected by the huge level of expectations and was fully concentrated on producing his best clip yet: “Red Bull gave me a complete freedom to build the set ups that have allowed me to do the tricks that have just been in my dreams until now.”

 

SHIMANO MTB Grand Prix Draws out Endurance Racing Talent

The U23 Australian National 24H Solo Champion Mark Tupalski won round three of the SHIMANO MTB Grand Prix endurance racing series at Ourimbah MTB Park near Wyong on the weekend. His fellow Canberran Ed McDonald claimed the second place after a tight race with a local club rider from the Central Coast. Max Richardson from Wamberal came in third after a sensational performance in the prestigious seven hour Solo Elite classification. Sarah Neumann from Newcastle dominated the women’s solo fields again and in the four hour racing categories Jon Odams from Sans Souci took out the Solo Elite title in the men’s and lap racing newcomer Nienke Oostra won the female category.

Overall race winner Mark Tupalski from Canberra loved the trails at Ourimbah.
Successful first lap race for offroad triathlete Nienke Oostra.

The name Max Richardson was on everyone’s lips as the SHIMANO Mountain Bike Grand Prix seven-hour solo riders crossed the line – with 14 completed laps on the 8.5km course in just under seven hours, the 20-year old rider from the hosting Central Coast Ourimbah MTB Club secured himself a podium position at Saturday’s race in the GP7 hour Elite Men’s category. As the race unfolded spectators and supporters of the top three riders realised that Max Richardson was completely unaware of the calibre of riders that he was challenging, up until lap six even placing in second position in the progress results.

Solid performance by Max Richardson at the SHIMANO MTB GP 7 hour race at Ourimbah.

“This year my big focus is on cross-country events – I just love riding my bike and Bikeworx Erina has been supporting me to enter the entire SHIMANO Mountain Bike Grand Prix series. Racing is the best kind of training, they say, so to get such a big endurance race to the Central Coast is great!”, said the talented rider at the finish. With a previous ninth and this third place on his home track in the five-race series by Rocky Trail he will be racing for a top position overall and will be a rider to watch out for in the next few years.

Overall race win goes to Tupalski, series lead stays with Webster
Equally surprised were the Canberrans Mark Tupalski and Ed McDonald, who completed the most laps overall in the race with Tupalski winning by 7.33 minutes. “This is a great track and I gave it my best. It seems Richardson came out of nowhere, congratulations on a great performance!”, said Tupalski after the race and added that he was looking forward to the final two series races at The Australian Botanic Garden, Mt Annan in July and on his home track at Stromlo Forest Park in Canberra in September.

After three events in the five-race series, Grant Webster from Tea Gardens (NSW) maintains his series lead in the GP7 hour Solo Elite category. With a fourth place at Ourimbah he increased his lead by 100 points over second Duncan Middleton from Dungog (NSW). Young Max Richardson is now ex aequo on third with last year’s series winner Andrew Lloyd from Newcastle.

Sarah Neumann from Newcastle was the fastest lady out on course, winning the GP7 Hour Elite Female classification. With her third consecutive win she also clearly leads the series.

Fastest female lap time and 7-hour solo race win for Sarah Neumann from Newcastle.

Odams shows strong form, newcomer Oostra wows crowd
Jon Odams from Sans Souci took out the GP4 hour Elite Men’s race and offroad triathlete Nienke Oostra from Sydney claimed the women’s title in what was her first lap race. The female solo GP4 hour series lead, however, stays with Odam’s team rider Susanna Fasold from Bonnet Bay (NSW), who holds a gap of 23 points ahead of Emily Cunningham (Kirrawee NSW) and Laura Renshaw (Merewether NSW). In the men’s GP4 hour solo classification, Jorge Baron Morris from Kensington (NSW) holds onto his series lead with a fourth place at Ourimbah. Round 4 promises to be a tight race for him, as his gap dropped to 9 points over James Lamb from Bondi (NSW) and cross country state series champion Kyle Ward from Wollongong.

Jon Odams takes out GP4 hour solo elite category.

 

The next series event will be held at The Australian Botanic Garden, Mt Annan near Campbelltown on 13 July ahead of the final round in September at Stromlo Forest Park in Canberra. For more information and detailed results, visit www.rockytrailentertainment.com

7 hour race
Elite Men Solo
1. Mark Tupalski (Onya Bike Belconnen), Canberra ACT, 15 laps in 7:06.39
2. Ed McDonald (Target Trek Racing), Canberra ACT, 15 laps in 7:14.12
3. Max Richardson (Bikeworx Erina), Wamberal NSW, 14 laps in 6:47.
Elite Women Solo
1. Sarah Neumann (Cheeky Velosport), Newcastle NSW, 12 laps in 7:00.23
2. Liz Smith, Mt Ousley NSW, 12 laps in 7:12.41

4 hour race

Elite Men Solo
1. Jon Odams (Bike Culture), Sans Souci NSW, 9 laps in 4:13.55
2. James Lamb (SCV Imports / Rocky Trail), Erina/Bondi NSW, 9 laps in 4:25.28
3. Kyle Ward (Rockstar Racing), Wollongong NSW, 8 laps in 4:04.17
Elite Women Solo
1. Nienke Oostra (MarathonMTB.com), Sydney NSW, 7 laps in 4:08.41
2. Belinda Diprose, Drummoyne NSW, 7 laps  in 4:28.48
3. Emily Cunningham (Sneaky Bacon Racing), Kirrawee NSW, 6 laps in 4:04.24

Video: Val di Sole World Cup DH Finals

DirtTV: Val di Sole Finals a Mountain Biking video by orpheusproductions

What a race! Stating the Atherton’s are on it doesn’t do their performance justice. Rach and Gee smoked the field and made a super rough track bow down and obey.

There were some stand out saves and lines in this race, the prize for best gap goes to Remi Thirion with his rock garden huck. Keep an eye out at 3.25 for this one.

Some of the big guns were slain by this savage track, Danny Hart and Sam Hill were both big hopes for this race but came unstuck high in the Italian valley.

Check out all the race action and some interesting post race analysis with Sven Martin as he talks to Steve Jones Rachel Atherton about everything from racing and bikes to his best question. “Why did you suck so much at World Champs last year?”

Video: “Checking in from Czech”, Trek Factory Racing

Leading up to this weekend’s UCI World Cup race in Val di Sole, Italy, the team has released its latest video.

The video recaps the second round of the series in Nove Mesto na Morave, Czech where Bec Henderson extended her series lead and retained leader’s jersey.  Simultaneously, Dan McConnell found himself tied for points on the overall, but not in the jersey, after having garnered it following his first round victory.

Cairns to host 2017 World Championships

The UCI Management Committee announced today that the 2016 UCI BMX World Championships will be held in Medellin, Columbia, and that Cairns, Australia, will host the 2017 UCI Mountain Bike & Trials World Championships.

Meeting in Bergen, Norway, the Management Committee meetings were held alongside meetings of the Professional Cycling Council (PCC).

UCI President Pat McQuaid said: “blah, blah, blah, blah…..” (GET TO THE IMPORTANT BIT, PATTY!)

McQuaid continued: “In 2017, the UCI Mountain Bike & Trials World Championships will be held on the iconic Smithfield course in Cairns. We’re certain that the thousands of professional athletes, coming from all around the globe, will relish competing in this beautiful tropical location.”

Read the full release here.

 

Video: This is Peaty – Season 2 – Episode 2

It’s been a dream of Peaty’s for a while, to head out to the Isle of Man and take a lap round the TT course…

Even at cruising speed, you can’t even start to think how fast the competitors fly round the track, putting everything on the line, year after year.  Legends such as John Mcguiness and Connor Cummins took a bit of time out of their hectic schedule to meet up for a chin wag, to discuss all things speed and two wheels.

Before he could even pack his backs, it was go time yet again, for the first big trip of the season, out to California for some Syndicate beach time and the infamous Sea Otter Classic event.

After a ‘relaxing’ few days in downtown Santa Cruz, with two slightly battered beach cruisers in tow, the full team headed off to Laguna Sec Raceway to see if all that off-season training had paid off…

With strong results for everyone in the Downhill and a nail-biting slalom finish for Peaty, it was a perfect start to the year. As you’ll see, Kathy Sessler was stoked.

Video: Specialized Racing, UCI World Cup DH1 – Fort William

The much anticipated start to the 2013 UCI World Cup Downhill season arrived with round one at Fort William, Scotland. An unusually long break combined with atypical dry conditions on a course known for its difficulty added complexity for riders and support crew alike. Aaron Gwin and Troy Brosnan played it somewhat safe by focusing on regaining their race rhythm and dialing-in bike and equipment setup. Both put in respectable top-20 performances with eyes on the podium in coming weeks.

Fresh Product: 2013 Royal Racing Race Gear

Some fresh racing gear from Royal Racing

RACE SHORT
Listening to the feedback from world renowned competitors has enabled Royal Racing to create a race short which is non-restrictive, Ultra lightweight (only 485g) vented for airflow and minimum drag. The 2013 Race Short is worthy of the world-class riders who have developed it.

Features:

  • Unique ‘pedal friendly’ tailored fit
  • Laser cut ventilated 500D polyester body fabric
  • Weightless sublimated no fade graphics
  • 4 way stretch flex zones front and rear
  • Dual adjustable hook and loop waist adjustment tabs
  • Full moisture wicking quick dry mesh lining

RACE JERSEY

New design for 2013.Technically engineered airflow mesh fabric enables superior venting and performance with minimum drag and ultra lightweight (only 195g). We will let you be the judge of it possibly been the most advanced MTB DH race jersey ever!

Features:

  • Airflow fabric
  • Weightless mesh
  • Engineered mesh
  • Low profile leatt compatible sponge padded neck construction
  • Rear neck expanding panel
  • Side of body and pit venting panels
  • Flat no scratch rear neck label
  • Wrap around arm venting

Be sure to purchase all royal racing collections at a local dealer near you!

Junior Development and Coaching Camp for Mountain Biking in Western Australia

The Perth Mountain Bike Club are holding a Junior Development (JDC) and Coaching Development camp specifically for mountain biking in Pemberton on the 12 – 14 July 2013.

The idea behind the camp was to bring mountain bike specific coaches from the Eastern States and Northern Territory to train our U15 – U19 juniors to National level. PMBC would then mentor these riders over the rest of 2013 and form a junior state team to take to the MTB Nationals in 2014.

With fantastic support from the Department of Sport and Recreation (DSR) this idea has grown to running a coaching development camp at the same time. The interest in both of these camps has been overwhelming with both camps filling the quotas of 20 juniors and 12 coaches well before the cut off dates.

The camp is based at the Pemberton Camp School and the beautiful Pemberton MTB park. This venue enables us to deliver every aspect of a coaching camp and JDC without having to move people around in a car or bus from venue to venue.

A big part of the coaching camp will be the real life experience our coaches will get in being part of the JDC while doing their level 1 MTB coaching accreditation. This will be a massive bonus for the coaches and juniors alike.

Cycling Australia and Mountain Bike Australia have been extremely helpful and supportive in logistics of the coaching development camp. On top of that, Westcycle and WAMBA have also been very supportive in this great initiative, the first of its kind in Australia.

Trek Bicycles, The Target Trek MTB team, Bontrager and Shotz Sports Nutrition have all gotten behind the JDC camp providing gifts, prizes and give aways for every participant.

Tim Ellison, is directing the training and assessing of our coaches. He is a national MTB coach and national XCO selector from the NT. Jenny King is a level 2 coach, she is a current multiple National Champion from Vic and is really excited to be part of our JDC. We also have local downhill legends Dion Baker and Rex Dubois to show the juniors how to corner, jump, rail and nail every obstacle.

Why no U13’s you ask, PMBC already have an awesome partnership with local MTB development company “Rock and Roll MTB”. Rock and Roll have a program to develop and nurture the U9’s and U13’s all the way from very beginner to racing at state level.

Mountain Biking is certainly in a massive growth stage and is a very popular sport all the way from the weekend warrior to the elite racer. Initiatives like the JDC and Coaching Development camp will only help grow our sport and hopefully provide our WA juniors with a pathway to international stardom.

Rachel and Gee Atherton Take a Double World Cup Victory at Fort William

The GT Factory Racing team put in a sensational weekend’s riding culminating in a double World Cup victory for the awesome Athertons with Gee setting a new course record of 4:36.72 and Rachel absolutely smashing it, putting a clear 10 seconds into the rest of the field with her time of 5:08.84.

Brother and sister Gee and Rachel enjoying the win.

It was an emotional victory for the team – not only their first joint World Cup victory since 2010 but an emphatic end to Rachel’s run of disappointing second places on the course that she has called her nemesis. Emotions at the other extreme for young Taylor Vernon who took first in Saturday’s junior seeding only to suffer a mechanical in the top section on his finals run. Marc Beaumont posted a solid 11th spot in the mens elite to top of the weekend for the team.

The sun shone all weekend which meant the track was fast, loose and blown out. Taylor was up first and was last to start. Everything seemed to be going to plan when he was fastest at the first split but disaster struck when his rear tyre punctured, leaving him to roll down the hill to the groans of a sympathetic crowd. Taylor said ”I am gutted but it was no-ones fault, sometimes stuff just happens.“

In the women’s race Great Britains’s Manon Carpenter put in an amazing run to steal the hot seat from Emile Ragot with a great 5:18.985, even more impressive given that she was fighting food poisoning on Friday.

Rachel was last down having qualified fastest in Saturdays qualification round. She didn’t disappoint the record Fort William crowd when she went quickest at all three interval times, breaking the timing beam on the finish line she set an amazing 5.08.84 which set her winning margin to a massive 10 seconds. In her race run Rachel said “ It felt sketchy from the start – there were loads of places where I was half an inch off my line and skidding – it felt awful. I was convinced I’d thrown it away, I couldn’t believe it when I can through the finish and saw the time, and everyone was going wild for me. I made a sign for the podium because I want to say a massive thank you to all of the fans for sticking by me, and to GT for the brilliant new Fury and all of the sponsors who really work us, and to Dan Brown and Lundy and the team, I felt so relaxed this weekend, right up to my run everything went so smooth. Thanks.”

Rachel Atherton backing up her first place in qualifying with a solid win.

The podium in the Men’s Elite was always going to be hard fought with 6 or 7 riders qualifying within seconds of each other. The crowd went absolutely crazy as Brook MacDonald took the lead with 4.37.854, Steve Smith following just 0.2 behind. ‘Sick’ Mick Hannah was 0.2 up on Brook at the first split but he lost time to sit in third behind Smith until Sam Blenkinsop toppled him by 0.4. Gee was last but one to race and he positively flew down the track – despite a small bobble with a rock that damaged his chain, he was 1.2 seconds up at the first split and the crowd went crazy, at split two he was still 1.129 up and he finished on a lightning hot 4.36.712 – breaking his own course record. Only Danny Hart remained but he couldn’t get close to the top guys finishing 7th with 4.39.56.

Gee said “I am so stoked, I Loved that. When I saw Rachel’s results I knew I had it all to do – I’m really proud of her , thanks everyone.”

Rounding off the weekend in style GT Factory Racing also took the team award and the leaders jerseys in both the mens and women’s categories. The World Cup show now rolls on to round two next weekend where we return to another venue where the Athertons have managed the double, Val di Sole, Italy.

Gee Atherton on his way to victory at Fort William.

Video: Fort William UCI World Cup #1 Finals

The weather was perfect, the track was savage and the racing was truly incredible. The best crowd on the circuit made sure the riders knew who they wanted to win.

With the fastest riders in the world pinning it down Aonach Mor the World Cup circus threw out it’s best performance in the Scottish sun.

We had all the action covered from CG styling it up to Gwin talking line choice. Sit back, relax and get ready for a six pack of downhill.

Fort WIlliam World Cup Results

Round one of the Downhill series at the UCI Mountain Bike World Cup presented by Shimano became a family affair, with the brother and sister team of Gee and Rachel Atherton (GT Factory Racing) crushing the competition in the elite men’s and women’s races at Fort William, Scotland, on Sunday.

British riders have always upped their game at what is, essentially, their home course, and this year was no different. Fort William is considered one of the gravity centers of the sport, and boasts some of the biggest and most enthusiastic crowds of the year. At nearly five minutes long, the track is also one of the hardest, requiring technical skills for the rocky upper section, and power and fitness for the bottom half.

Rachel Atherton qualified first among the women, over six seconds in front of Emmeline Ragot (Lapierre Gravity Republic), but the defending overall World Cup champion has been burned before in Scotland, finishing second the last three years. Fort William was the only major downhill result missing from her resumé.

Emilie Siegenthaler (Gstaad-Scott) set the first sub-5:30 time, which held until Nicole Myriam (Commencal/Riding Addiction) went below 5:25. Manon Carpenter (Madison Saracen) then took the leading time below 5:20, but Ragot and Atherton were still to ride. Ragot couldn’t manage to overtake Carpenter, so it was down to Atherton, and the British champion did not falter, finishing over ten seconds ahead of her compatriot.

“Winning is just ridiculously hard here,” Atherton commented. “I have qualified first a few years here. You can’t let your guard down. It is such a wild track and that run was just so messy all the way down, I was just thinking I’m throwing it away, the other girls are going to be smoother. I couldn’t believe it when I crossed the line and finally heard the crowd cheering, instead of groaning like normal. I can’t believe it.”

Atherton leads the overall standings with 250 points, followed by Carpenter at 190 and Ragot at 180.

Unlike the women, the men’s race did not have a single clear favourite. Danny Hart (Giant Factory), the 2011 world champion, qualified first, but less than two-tenths of a second ahead of Gee Atherton.

The leading time crept down slowly, with Austin Warren (Pivot Factory Team) the first to go under 4:50. Local Scottish rider Greg Williamson (Trek World Racing) was the next to spend any length of time in the Hot Seat, but the fastest riders were just starting to come down.

Sam Hill (ChainReactionCycles.com/Nukeproof), who won the world title in Fort William in 2007, broke the 4:40 mark, but that would not prove to be enough to make the podium. Only two riders later Brook MacDonald (Trek World Racing) took the lead, with five riders remaining, setting the stage for some of the closest times ever seen. The next three riders all came within nine-tenths of a second of MacDonald, but none could surpass the New Zealand rider.

Then it was the turn of Atherton, the 2010 winner at Fort William. The British champion was running the rock sections at the top noticeably faster than any other rider and, although he lost a few tenths of a second in the lower half, he still crossed the line 1.142 seconds faster than MacDonald to take the lead. Hart covered the top sections of the course almost as quickly as Atherton before fading in the pedaling section to finish seventh.

“I can’t begin to describe it,” said Atherton. “It is a pretty emotional feeling. It has been a while since I won here, and my sister won on the same day. It doesn’t get better than this. I was scared, but it was a smooth run. This is the first run on a new bike but it went smooth. I couldn’t have asked for a better run really. I am stoked to start the World Cup series like this. Bring it on, I say.”

Atherton leads the World Cup with 240 points, followed by MacDonald with 180 and Steve Smith (Devinci Global Racing) with 162.

In the new Junior mens’s World Cup category, Noel Niederberger (Gstaad-Scott) was the top finisher, followed by Michael Jones (FMD/Intense Cycles) and Lucas Dean (Australian National).

Watch the UCI DH World Cup Live and Exclusive This Weekend

The time has come for the world’s fastest men and women to gather for the opening round of the 2013 UCI Downhill World Cup.

Downhill mountain biking royalty Aaron Gwin, Greg Minnaar, Steve Smith, Brook Macdonald and the Athertons will be taking on the legendary Fort William World Cup track and we’ll be there to capture the action.

It’s going to be rough and it’s definitely going to be tough, but they will do anything to rise above the rest at Fort William.

Epic Out to Break New Ground

Australia’s pioneer mountain bike marathon, the Flight Centre Cycle Epic, is chasing new ground this year after participation records were smashed in the 10th anniversary of the event in 2012.

The 11th staging of the Epic at Spicers Hidden Vale in the Lockyer Valley, west of Brisbane, is being held on the weekend of the federal election, September 14-15, 2013

Race organisers are hoping to attract more than 2,000 riders to compete in the various events after a record 1700 competitors entered last year’s event.

The highlight of the Epic weekend is the 87km marathon on Sunday, September 15. The event, which has Flight Centre Active Travel as major sponsor, has been won over the years by some of the biggest names in Australian mountain biking.

Epic organiser and track builder Hayden Brooks said participants who register for the 2013 event by July 1 will be eligible for early bird pricing and a complimentary Epic cycling jersey.

“We have received more than 400 entries already for the Epic so it’s shaping as another record breaking year,” Mr Brooks said.

“The early bird offer has helped entice plenty of entries already and again this year we are seeing quite a few families embracing the event.”

The weekend has multiple events and activities beyond the 87km marathon, including the 50km Pursuit, the 20km Spicers Chaser, Mini and Minor Epics for children, plus a 4.2km free Family Fun Ride.

“There’s now something for the whole family, where children can challenge their parents and even their grandparents,” said Mr Brooks, who runs the event with his wife Fleur and Tod Horton.

The Brooks have helped turn Spicers Hidden Vale into the premier mountain bike venue in South East Queensland with the 4800ha estate now hosting three events a year – the 3PLUS3 race just before Christmas and the KONA 24HR during the Easter weekend.

“The Epic over the years has attracted many elite riders with world 24 hour champion Jason English winning the men’s race last year and Brisbane’s Jodie Willett claiming her third women’s title,” Mr Brooks said.

“But our focus has been attracting families and introducing people to the sport of mountain biking while having a great weekend at the Hidden Vale Adventure Park.”

Mr Brooks said they have partnered with Scody who are designing and supplying the jerseys this year while PCS Coaching – www.pcscoaching.com.au – have tailored training plans for the 87km and 50km events.

The Flight Centre Cycle EPIC is on 14-15 September at Spicers Hidden Vale located at Grandchester, about 55 minutes’ drive from Brisbane.

For more information about the Epic or to register for the event go to: http://www.cycleepic.com.auor Facebook fb.com/hiddenvaleadventurepark

 

Fresh Product: Magellan Cyclo 105 HC GPS

Compact in design, rugged and waterproof to IPX-7 standards, the Magellan Cyclo 105HC portable GPS gives you a rich array of data.

The Magellan records many things, including heart rate, cadence, time, speed, distance, accurate elevations (with built in Barometric Altimeter), calories consumed and tracks your movement with the built-in high sensitivity SIRF III GPS receiver. The Cyclo 105HC fitness GPS device gives you rich data at your fingertips while you are on the move and records these stats for analysis at the end of your journey.

The included Heart Rate Monitor and Cadence sensor means you can also gather data while training indoors.

For the complete out the box solution, with all the inclusions, the Magellan Cyclo 105HC fitness GPS device is the all in one cycling companion, no matter what type of cyclist you are.

Strong International Field Confirmed for 2013 GENCO Mongolia Bike Challenge

The 2013 GENCO Mongolia Bike Challenge presented by Orbea is shaping up to be the most competitive edition yet with endurance athletes from around the world set to take the starting line on September 1, 2013.

Mongolia Bike Challenge 2012 Promo Video from Aaron Larocque on Vimeo.

The elite field is a diverse mix of world-class international athletes, including mountain bikers, road racers, triathletes, and adventurer racers, all with the same goal of reigning supreme in the Land of Genghis Khan.

Confirmed racers include:

Cory Wallace, Canada (Kona Factory): Mongolia Bike Challenge Champion (2012), Mongolia Bike Challenge (2011) 2nd, 24hr Canadian Champion (2011 & 2012), 24hr World Championship (2011) 2nd, Trans Rockies Champion (2009)

Jason Sager & Thomas Turner, USA (Team Jamis): BC Bike Race Champions (Team, 2012), Cyclocross World Champion, 30-34 (Turner, 2013)

Ondra Fojtik, Czech Republic (Team Crocodile Trophy): Crocodile Trophy Champion (2008), Iron Bike Italy Champion (2002, 2003, 2004, 2012)

Marcel & Pau Zamora, Spain (Buff-Niner): 5-time Ironman France Champion (Marcel), Mongolia Bike Challenge (2012, Pau) 4th

Erich Wegsheider, USA (Rolf Prima-Orbea): Lavaman Champion (2011, Triathlon)

Antonio Ortiz, Spain (SMP): Roc d’Azur (2002) 6th, Spanish Marathon Championships (2005) 4th, Spanish Cyclocross Championships (2007) 4th

Wolfgang Krenn, Austria (Zwillingscraft Stevens/ Sc Kanuf Liezen/Crocodile Trophy): Salzkammergut Trophy Champion (2011), Crocodile Trophy (2011) 2nd, Cape Epic (2013) 11th

Carter Hovey, Canada (Team MBC): Trans Rockies Champion (Team, 2011), BC Bike Race (2012) 6th, Mongolia Bike Challenge (2012) 5th

Lee Rodgers, UK (Lapierre Asia): Singapore National Road Race Champion (2010), Singapore National TT Champs Champion (2011), Tour de East Java (2012) 2nd GC, Tour of Friendship Champion, GC (2013)

Fan Yung-Yi, Taiwan (Orbea Taiwan): Taiwan KOM Challenge Champion (2010,  2011)

Sonya Looney, USA (Topeak Ergon):  Breck Epic Champion (2010, 2011), Yak Attack Champion (2012, 2013)

Giuliana Massarotto, Italy (Rudy Project Pedali Di Marca Team Performance): Italian 24hr National Champion (2012), WEMBO 24hr World Championships (2012) 4th

Elisabeth Adamson, Australia (3FIDI): Mongolia Bike Challenge Champion (2012), Australian National 24hr Championships (2013) 2nd

Jennifer Schulz, Canada (Balance Point Racing): BC Bike Race Champion (2012)

The 2013 GENCO Mongolia Bike Challenge presented by Orbea will take place September 1 – 7, 2013. For more information visit www.mongoliabikechallenge.com

Mount Gunjin Trails Open For Business

Dirt Art are pleased to announced that our latest Western Australian trail project is now open for business.

The network of trails on Mount Gunjin provides a significant addition to the existing Kalamunda Circuit (approximately 22km), through the installation of 5.5km of all-mountain/gravity cross country descents, a new 2km section of climbing trail and a 500m descent back into the existing circuit.  The highlight of the development is the fast, free-flowing descents, which include three upper mountain trails, two mid-mountain trails and a single trail to the base of Mount Gunjin.  The trails feature a range of steel and timber trail features, berms, a jump line and a range of technical rocky terrain.  Regarded by many as the signature trail of the development ‘Judderbars’ is all about flow, offering a kilometre of swooping bermed turns, rollers and jumps.  The Gunjin development is firmly geared towards gravity cross country/all mountain riding, and offers a true mountain bike playground for all comers.

Dirt Art Director Simon French quotes the project as; ‘these trails are the definition of fun on a mountain bike, we had the ability and scope to open our bag of trail building tricks very wide for this project- the trails have a bit of everything, from technical dirt jumps to grin-inducing flow trails.  Our crew want to take this piece of hill home with us’.

As an addition to the gravity trail development and in support of their efforts advocating for the project, Dirt Art have provided the Western Australian Mountain Bike Association (WAMBA) with a $10,000+ in-kind donation towards this development.

Dirt Art acknowledge the significant efforts of Lindsay Alsop (Vice President) and the Western Australian Mountain Bike Association, who have tirelessly advocated for these trails, including sourcing the funding to allow for professional construction.  For more information on WAMBA or to join head to www.wamba.org.au

Fresh Product: Finish Line Chill Zone Anti-Seize

Chill Zone works like magic! Before discarding your rusted chain or giving up on a frozen crank bolt, a rusted derailleur spring, or a seized seat post, give Chill Zone a shot. Bike parts that normally need to be replaced can be reconditioned to ride another day.

A special refrigerant propellant freezes metal as low as -50°F/-45°C. This causes contraction of the metal and creates micro-cracks in the rust. A penetrating release agent then breaks down and flushes out the rust. With Chill Zone, most rusted parts will quickly regain full functionality.

After freeing seized or rusted parts, no lubrication is necessary because Chill Zone. leaves behind lubricant and rust inhibitors to protect parts and prevent further corrosion.

Simply spray the rusted part for 10 to 20 seconds and wait 60 to 90 seconds for the release agent to fully wick in and break the rust. For sever rust-welded parts, spray for longer and wait at least five minutes for maximum effect. When rehabbing a bicycle chain, soak one small section at a time.

 

Lusty Industries Appointed Distributor of Troy Lee Designs

Lusty Industries & Distributors are absolutely stoked to announce they are the newly appointed distributor of world leading Speed Equipment supplier Troy Lee Designs, also incorporating James Stewarts apparel company SEVEN and the co-branded DC Shoes Apparel.

Troy Lee Designs needs no introduction into the world of Action and Motor Sports. It is one of the world’s most revered brands and is synonymous with ‘The World’s Fastest Racers’ whilst continuing to create products that exceed cutting edge style, design and quality. Troy Lee Designs has a strong connection to channels such as F1 to Indy to NASCAR, Motocross to Enduro to Freestyle MX, Dirt Track to Road Racing, MTB to BMX to downhill and XC.

“Lusty Industries has an unrivalled track record in successful marketing and building Action Sports brands within the Australian Market, all of my team are pumped to be able to drive Troy Lee Designs to the next level in our markets along with rocking the products everyday of the week ourselves”

“Using the experience from our motivated and youthful team plus the considerable resources at our disposal the simple objective is to maximize the opportunities that Troy Lee and his team have created through their amazing products. I have looked to Troy Lee Designs since founding Lusty Industries with admiration and influence, to be able to offer this brand to Australian Consumers is a very humbling and proud moment for me personally. Troy Lee Designs and Lusty Industries have a long term strategy for growth, the brand has such a great heritage and an amazing future and this is all seen through their continued investment and innovation. Most importantly with everything we do at Lusty Industries is to have a bunch of fun and create some cool marketing initiatives.” said Lusty Industries Managing Director, Johnny McLean.

“I’m excited to partner with a team of young professionals, whom I can tell have the same commitment to the action sports that I love. I’m confident Lusty Industries is focused on expanding the Troy Lee Designs brand throughout Australia. I’m equally stoked to start a long-term relationship with Johnny’s innovative team, and I feel they have a ton of horsepower. Lusty’s energetic sales force & outstanding infrastructure are impressive. It’s obvious that they’re eager to push our brand to the next level. All of us are excited about what the future holds working with such a proactive and progressive distributor.

In closing, I’d like to thank Steve Cramer and the entire staff of Steve Cramer Products for 20+ years of support, and want to wish them well.” Said, Troy Lee founder and owner of Troy Lee Designs.

The 2014 Troy Lee Designs Motorcycle range will be available from Lusty industries starting the 3rd June with Bicycle and Sportswear available in July. SEVEN Brand and DC Motorcycle apparel availability is TBD.

Fresh Product: Teva Pivot Clipless Shoes

Life can be an uphill battle – especially on a mountain bike, so we designed our first-ever clipless shoe to help ease your ascent.

It’s light, comfortable and supportive through the full pedaling motion – and it works (and looks) great off the bike, too. The cleat attachment is compatible with all major 2-bolt attachment systems, and you can quick-adjust it through the sole from above (so you can do it while it’s attached to the pedal). A hook and loop strap keeps your laces out of the chain, and its sneaker styling means it looks great with shorts – and terrible with spandex.

This is a men’s model with extended sizing for women and children. We recommend women order 2 full sizes down, e.g., women’s size 8 should choose size 6.

T.I.D.E. GRIP

  • Our Spider365 Rubber sole will hold its grip in all kinds of environments.
  • PedalLINK Clipless outsole for all mountain riding.
  • Cleat attachment is compatible with all major 2-Bolt cleat systems.

T.I.D.E. COMFORT

  • Optional Cleat attachment from top to protect hardware (compatible with Crankbrothers® and Shimano® SPD® cleats).
  • Composite midsole plate for pedaling efficiency and walkability.

Introducing The Santa Cruz Solo

Steve Peat takes his new Santa Cruz Solo into the wilds of Scotland.

Santa Cruz Solo from santa cruz bikes on Vimeo.

Solo pushes further into the realms of 27.5″ wheel size possibilities. Developed using what we learned from Bronson, it takes the design platform in a different direction.

The low bottom bracket height, shorter chainstays and 125mm of progressive VPP suspension give Solo its snappy, nimble, ride.

A 68 degree head angle adds climbing agility into the equation, whilst a 5lb carbon frame weight define Solo as the tool for that back country mission you’ve always planned.

Responsibly offered in Mountain Rescue Orange, Solo goes where no bike has gone before.

The Kowalski Classic – Entries Now Open

The Kowalski Classic features two race distances over the very best trails in East Kowen and Sparrow Hill. Both distances contain a mind-bendingly high proportion of singletrack (so, your face may get sore on account of all the smiling).

Of course, we know you want a bit of mongrel in your racing, so we’ve put in a stem-kissing climb here and there to send your HRM to bleepsville. This year’s course takes in brand new trails, built especially for the race and launched officially on race day – including what is quite possibly the highest single track in the ACT region.

If you like riding lots (and lots) of singletrack, then you will LOVE the Kowalski Classic.

THE FULL KOWALSKI (Circa 90-100km)
THE HALF KOWALSKI (Circa 50km)

ENTER HERE

Not sure what to expect? READ a few testimonials from last year.