Video: Within Two Worlds

“Within Two Worlds depicts an alternate perspective by giving us the illusion of times movement, signifying a beginning and end within a world of constant contradiction. It appears you are traveling in the midst of a dream, half-sleeping, half-waking, and touching the arch connecting heaven and earth.”

I discovered my passion for photography shortly after my mother’s passing while hiking the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) 3 years ago. This time-lapse video is my visual representation of how the night sky and landscapes co-exist within a world of contradictions. I hope this connection between heaven and earth inspires you to discover and create your own opportunities, to reach your rightful place within two worlds.

Within Two Worlds from Goldpaint Photography on Vimeo.

Racing: Tasmania's Hellfire Cup Entries Close This Friday

The trails are ready. The prize & swag giveaway pool is over $100,000. Two lucky people are going home with $3,000 Avanti Competitor Mountain bikes as spot prizes. The beer is being labelled and stacked in the cool room. For some reason, we’ve found some pants and we promise we will put them on for the after party. This thing is going to be big and it’s going to be fun as hell.

_DG15132a

That’s right folks.

It’s your last chance to enter the 2013 Hellfire Cup.

ENTRIES CLOSE FRIDAY NOVEMBER 1st 2013.

Racing: Tasmania’s Hellfire Cup Entries Close This Friday

The trails are ready. The prize & swag giveaway pool is over $100,000. Two lucky people are going home with $3,000 Avanti Competitor Mountain bikes as spot prizes. The beer is being labelled and stacked in the cool room. For some reason, we’ve found some pants and we promise we will put them on for the after party. This thing is going to be big and it’s going to be fun as hell.

_DG15132a

That’s right folks.

It’s your last chance to enter the 2013 Hellfire Cup.

ENTRIES CLOSE FRIDAY NOVEMBER 1st 2013.

Calling All Women! Take The MTBA Survey And Win A $200 Gift Card

Women who ride bikes are being called on to give their comments in the Cycling Australia and Mountain Bike Australia 2013 Female Member Survey.

The highly active Cycling Australia Women’s Commission, re-established in April and headed up by Chair, Monique Hanley, are focused on improving conditions for women who ride; from women riding their bike their local community through to women competing in the sport of cycling from club to international level.

Since their inception, the Women’s Commission have established operational procedures, set out a two year project program and now invite you to be part of the process of making positive changes for women in cycling.

The survey, to be introduced as an annual process, asks why you cycle, what you enjoy about your membership, and what could be further improved in terms of membership, CA/MTBA operations, recreational riding and racing. All feedback, good and bad, is welcome so we can work on improving all aspects of our sport.

Survey responses are anonymous and they close on 8 November 2013.

As a Christmas bonus, when you complete the survey you have the opportunity to go into the draw to win a $200 Myer Gift Card.

The survey can be found at MEMBER SURVEY

Should you wish to provide further feedback, please send an email to the Women’s Commission secretariat Alex Bright or Chair of the CA Women’s Commission Monique Hanley.

Find out more about the CA Women’s Commission at cycling.org.au or read more at www.austcycle.com.au

Video: A Human Spirit Film – Blind Ambition

Hein Wagner was born blind, but, rather than seeing it as a disability, has chosen to view it as a challenge.

And Hein knows about challenges. As a true global adventurer, he has finished numerous Ironman competitions, completed the Cape-to-Rio Sailing Challenge and is the current World Blind Land Speed Record Holder. As a corporate motivational speaker, Hein shares his unique and remarkable experiences about his various adventures, none of which proved more difficult than the world’s toughest mountain bike race, the Absa Cape Epic. Done on a dare from his riding partner, Gerrie Olivier, Hein recounts the emotional story of courage, tears and triumph.

2013 MTBA Annual General Meeting – Notification

Notice is hereby given that the 2013 Annual General Meeting of the Association (MTBA) will be held on Saturday 16th November 2013 at 9.30am at the Airport Best Western, 33 Ardlie St, Attwood, Victoria 3049.

The following documents are available on the MTBA website in the Resources tab under the General resources section;

  • 2013 MTBA AGM Agenda
  • Management Committee Nomination  Form
  • State/Territory Council Nomination form
  •  Nomination Policy
  • MTBA Management Committee Code of Conduct
  • Proxy form

In accordance with the MTBA constitution, business conducted at the AGM will be limited to the items on the agenda.

All times in this notification and all the nomination and proxy documents are Australian Eastern Daylight time.

Nominations are now open and sought for the MTBA Management Committee Positions of:

  • Vice-President
  • Gravity Rider Representative
  • Bicycle Trials Rider Representative

Nominations are also open and sought for members to represent their State or Territory on the State and Territory Council.

Nominations are to be received by the MTBA Secretary by 5:00pm, Friday 8th November 2013 at one of the following addresses:

  • By Email: [email protected]
  • By Post: MTBA AGM Nomination, c/o PO Box 6310, Alexandria, NSW 2015

All forms associated with the AGM can be downloaded from here.

Video: The Salvadorian Way

Last April we spent 3 weeks filming in and around San Salvador, the capital city of El Salvador. Being home to nearly 6.3 million people, it’s the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America. Our plan was to meet up with local riders and discover new & un-documented trails and generally explore a new country with our bikes.

“We take the bicycle for granted. We have great days, we have not so great days. For a Salvadorian, the bicycle is life. For some, a necessity, for others an escape. Not just for the mind, but for the soul of its user. Through the dreams of a dedicated group of riders, biking is quickly becoming their saviour from the many troubles clouding this beautiful country. This film reveals the real reason they ride.” – Mike Gamble.

This journey opened up a new chapter in our book. How about you? There are many adventures to be had and more stories to discover.

Film – The Salvadorian Way from sheGNARnigans on Vimeo.

Video: Swift Rocky Mountain Project Season 2, Episode One

The Swift Rocky Mountain team is back at it.

This episode follows the team to Shepparton for the first race of the VDHS, and then off the Barjarg for the first round of the Alpine Gravity Elevation Gravity Enduro Series.

Swift RockyMountain Project Season 2 ep1 from Jake Lucas on Vimeo.

Baw Baw Set For Massive Mountain Bike Season

The single track season is about to step up a notch in eastern Victoria with Mount Baw Baw launching its mountain biking ‘green season’ on 30 November.

Kicking off the mountain bike action will be a Pin It To Win It downhill event for all comers, plus the Resort’s Seasons of Pain multisport event which features cross country mountain biking.

Since re-focusing its summer activities on single track action back in 2012, including a reinvigoration of its cross-country and downhill biking trails, Mount Baw Baw has earned a reputation as a quality mountain biking destination, something the mountain is out to leverage with more investment due in 2014.

The Resort, located 2.5 hours east of Melbourne, is already home to the ‘DH1’ – dubbed ‘The Beast’ – a national-standard downhill mountain bike course open from December to April.

Rated as “up there with Australia’s best DH trails” by Victorian Downhill Championship Series commentator and local Gippsland mountain bike guru, Nick King, DH1 has drawn high praise from competitor and recreational riders alike.

“On a scale of one to ten, the ‘DH1’ is an eleven,” said King of the ride experience.

A 300 vertical meter drop over a 1.3 kilometre distance ensures that the DH1 is a fast track, descent times only tamed by its highly technical nature, the two factors earning it a double black diamond (very difficult) rating.

Mt Baw Baw

Those attending the season launch on 30 November will vie for a $1000 cash prize pool in the Pin It To Win It competition, which challenges riders to target the most consistent (rather than simply fastest) descent times.

In January 2014, as part of its new Baw Baw Mountain Bike Festival, Mount Baw Baw will host Round 4 of the Victorian Downhill Championship Series (www.vdhs.com.au), with 350 expected to enter across categories to compete for series points, cash and prizes.

The downhill course rests on granitic soil, a foundation common in sub-alpine areas, which also makes for the best riding conditions. The course features wide-open sections with multiple riding lines through twisty alpine heath and snow gums.

Making further use of the stunning snowgum environment, the Mountain Bike Festival, slated for 26-27 January, will also feature a 4-Hour enduro event (www.mountbawbaw.com.au/events/baw-baw-twilight-4hr-mtb-enduro-2/), an 8km cross country loop course challenging entrants to squeeze in as many circuits as possible in four hours.

“We’re gearing up for our biggest season of mountain biking ever,” says Grant Seamer, Mount Baw Baw Marketing and Events Manager. The events are set highlights, but we really want to encourage riders up to Mount Baw Baw for recreational riding – just to experience the awesome single trail at their own pace, no clock to watch. That’s part of the beauty of riding Baw Baw: stopping to smell the roses, or the snowgum in the case of Baw Baw and the big views over the Alpine ranges and back over the Gippsland Valley. It’s a pretty special place to ride.”

In collaboration with the local Gippsland Mountain Bike Club (www.gippslandmtb.com.au/) and specialist trail designers, Resort management has invested in trail building, redesign and added new trails based on old-timer walking tracks. The latter have turned out to be a surprise packet well received by the cross-country crew, with trails now bedded in after a full season of use in 2013.

Mt Baw Baw 3 

“Mountain biking destination tourism is bigger than ever,” says Seamer. “And alpine resorts around the world, not to mention rural locations, are latching onto this growing market by investing in new trails for riding and mountain biking events. We don’t claim to be the first in Victoria to develop our mountain biking product, but we’re definitely the closest mountain-based option for riders in Melbourne looking for both world class downhill and cross country offerings. Plus, we believe the pristine snowgum environment makes for a unique riding experience.”

On the Baw Baw drawing board are plans for a new ‘flow’ style trail which if implemented will create a gigantic loop linking the back country trails on the flanks of the summit, with the village and on down to the bottom of the downhill track to make use of the shuttle bus service.

“We also have thoughts to leveraging access to Baw Baw’s lift lines, perhaps for a new technical trail packed with features to ride. We’re talking big plans that aim to cater to all levels of riders, from beginner up. If we can show the demand this season through recreational visitation and event patronage, we believe we can lift Baw Baw to being a focal centre for mountain biking in Victoria.”

Seamer notes that Mount Baw Baw has also engaged the services of a trail building professional who will work on the sustainability of all the mountain’s trails in the lead up to the opening on 30 November.

“We’re keen to develop our mountain biking proposition with absolute respect to the environment,” says Seamer. “It’s that very environment that makes riding here such a unique experience, so we are keen to develop trails sustainably and sensibly in line with the highest of environmental standards.”

Mount Baw Baw will welcome all riders to its season opening on 30 November, with the Pin It To Win It downhill competition, Season of Pain multisport and plenty more to entertain rider and non-riders alike.

More information at www.mountbawbaw.com.au

Mount Baw Baw MTB roster

30 November

DH1 Season Opening

Pin it 2 Win It ($1000 cash prize pool)

Season of Pain multisport (XC)

26-27 January

Baw Baw Mountain Bike Festival incl:

– Round 4 Victorian Downhill Championship Series

– 4-Hour Twilight Enduro

8 February
Season of Pain multisport (XC)

5-6 April

Kids’ Adventure Festival including junior mountain bike rides and clinics

26-27 April
Baw Baw Super-D

November – end April

  • XC and DH bike hire available
  • DH1 course open to the public seven days a week (excluding major event weekends). $10 trail access fee.
  • DH1 Shuttle bus runs every half hour 10am-4pm on weekends (blockout dates apply)
  • XC trail maps available, 24/7 riding weather pending

Cape to Cape, Stage 4: Blair and Fay seal the deal

The final stage of the Cape to Cape MTB finished with a fierce battle between 2011 Cape to Cape MTB Champion Andy Blair (VIC) and former Australian representative Peter Hatton (WA).

The fourth and final stage saw riders leave Colonial Brewery in Margaret River earlier this morning and finish up some 60kms later at the Dunsborough Country Club.

In a fast final day, at an average speed of 30kms per hour, attacks on the bunch started right from the get-go. In an entertaining day of riding, with lots of races within the race. There were guys riding for a position on GC, there was Mark Fenner and Jon Gregg battling out for the Masters and Jenny Fay and the girls going for it in the women’s race Masters rider Mark Fenner broke away from the lead pack early in the stage. However the 20 strong lead group didn’t allow Fenner time to relish his lead, closing the gap before hitting Cape Naturaliste Road and dropping into the single-track of Meelup National Park.

Cape to Cape-3

In the Women’s, Jenny Fay held a lead in the overall that soon became uncatchable, only a disaster would take the pink jersey away from her.

Throughout the stage, Andy Blair concentrated his efforts on securing a second overall win to really stamp his domination on the event. Working tightly with team mate Shaun Lewis, a power of work was done to ensure Blair took out the title.

Adrian Jackson(Merida Flight Centre) rode a really smart race, sitting with the lead group and keeping out of trouble to ultimately secure second place overall for the event. Brendan Johnston (Target Trek) crossed the line in fourth place today but claimed a spot on the podium, coming third for the event overall.

Western Australia’s famous slippery pea gravel is always a challenge for interstate riders, which was taken to the next level in the single-track in Meelup in the deciding last leg of the race. Andy Blair led a group into the final single track at Meelup while behind him Pete Hatton led a chase group together with team mate Craig Cooke. In a big effort through Meelup, Hatton managed to pass several riders through the single-track and catch Blair to set the scene for the final downhill sprint to the line.

Blair said, “I got a little gap over Hatto and Craig Cooke but they mowed me down at the end and I had no choice but to lead Hatto out hoping that riding in the front would be okay.”

Cape to Cape-1
Andy Blair claims his second Cape to Cape title.

The numerous spectators and support crew lining the finish line witnessed an incredible sprint to the finish. Peaking over the crest leading into the final straight at the Dunsborough Country Club, Hatton was the first to appear with Blair working hard to beat him to the line. In the end Hatton was simply too strong and fought off Blair’s attack to claim the stage win for the day.

“He’s got a good sprint on him,” said Blair. “It’s a bit of a replay from two years ago, we came in here and had a similar finish. It’s good to see Hatto take on the final stage which means a lot and I’m sure he’s happy about that.”

“And I’m happy with the jersey.”

Peter Hatton said, “It was pretty good today, it was a pretty hard stage with road tactics and it came down to a sprint finish in the end. The key was to make sure I was right up the front in Meelup’s single-track. Luckily I wasn’t too far back, I was right up on them. I felt pretty good and I was reasonably confident in the sprint and it was good to finish it off on a high.”

Women's winner Jenny Fay unleashes the fury.
Women’s winner Jenny Fay unleashes the fury.

At the Wildwood Road point of the course, it was Jenny Fay and Jo-Anne Bennett working together, a partnership that continued until they crossed the finish line almost simultaneously. Fay said, “I really was helping Jo today, because Target Trek have a really strong team, and Peta (Mullens) was helping Tory (Thomas). You know, we’re all mates and when it’s out there and I’m in the pink jersey it’s good for me to get into a bit of training and strengthening and I kept Jo up there.”

“In the last climb I told Jo how much there was left, and I just went on the last climb there to secure the win. I knew that was where I needed to go and I could hear her breathing deep. Because I can’t beat her over the pea gravel I gotta buy my time over that stuff.”

Jo said, “I felt better today, I just came good at the end again I think but not enough. It was good fun, I had a good time”.

“Today Jenny (Fay) and I worked together a bit as she had a big enough gap in the overall that it wasn’t going to affect her. So that was great we were able to work together, at the end of the day we are all great friends, not enemies”

“I haven’t done a stage race for 4 or 5 years now and I think I’m just a one-dayer now and you know I had a great time and the girls were awesome to race against. It was great to see so many guys and girls come over for the race and put on a good show for everyone.”

“It was good to be at and event on my doorstep”, she said.

Two women who also spent the day working together were Peta Mullens and Tory Thomas. “Today we had one aim which was to consolidate Tory’s second place,” said Mullens. “She had a bit of a rough patch on the road section and I did my best to bring her back up to Jo and Jenni which didn’t quite happen, but we held onto second and put her on the podium again. Looking after her in terms of gels and carrying her bottles. Tory got a mechanical on the road, she

snapped her seat, so I pushed her along a little bit and got on the front and tried to drive her along for as long as I could.” Thomas said, “The time gap would have been huge if Peta hadn’t saved my butt out there. There was a head wind, yeah she was so strong and waiting for me and doing roadie things like giving me water bottles. We really wanted a stage win, that would have been great but yeah so happy to get second.”

Today’s stage was the fourth and final in a record Cape to Cape MTB. Event Director Jason Dover said “The event this year was just remarkable. We had a record field of competitors, over 1,200, truly making this event the largest of its kind. Over the four days we’ve seen not only some incredible racing amongst the field of elites, but also some wonderful camaraderie and sportsmanship from the entire field”.

“The highlight for me was Andy Blair becoming the first rider since James Williamson to win the event twice. In a general sense seeing almost 1300 riders roll through the main street of Margaret River yesterday was another great moment.”

Racing: Mark Frendo takes Crocodile Trophy race win for Australia

For the first time in eight years an Australian has won the Crocodile Trophy!

Mark Frendo conquered the oldest and hardest mountain bike stage race in the world and after nine days, 900km and more than 15,000m of elevation finished in 30:40:17 ahead of the Canadian Cory Wallace and Jiri Krivanek from the Czech Republic. Paul Mashford (AUS) is fourth and today’s stage winner Josef Benetseder finishes the 19th Crocodile Trophy in fifth place. Fantastic result by Liesbeth Hessens – the fastest woman finishes 21st in the overall classification and wins ahead of the Italian racers Giordana Sordi and Maria Cristina Prati.

Jiri Krivanek, third overall, arriving on Grassy Hill
Jiri Krivanek, third overall, arriving on Grassy Hill

The 19th Crocodile Trophy finished today on Cooktown’s Grassy Hill. The oldest mountain bike stage race in the world had started last Saturday in Cairns and took riders across the Atherton Tablelands to historic mining towns deep in the Australian Outback. The race tracks throughout the nine day event included singletrails in Smithfield, marathon races through race forests, across Outback Highways and rough mining trails as well as a time trial stage on day seven. Sandy terrain, corrugated roads, narrow and flowy singletrails, gruelling climbs and fast descends – the Crocodile Trophy showcased the best mountain bike trails that Far North Queensland has to offer.

 Mark Frendo first Australian victor since 2005

“I’m so happy, it hasn’t set in really yet. But it’s a big achievement for me and I’m proud to have claimed a win for Australia after such a long time”, said a relieved Mark Frendo at the finish line today who is the first Australian Crocodile Trophy winner since Adam Hansen in 2004 and 2005. The 28-year old had to defend his early race lead over the past few days against none other that the Canadian National Marathon Champion and Mongolia Challenge winner Cory Wallace who finished with a gap of more than 12 minutes. He was motivated now to keep racing more, but it was still too early to say if he would be at the start next year, the exhausted race winner added.

Winners are grinners (l-r): Paul Mashford (AUS), Adventure Team winners David Stellan and Isaac Tonello (AUS), Jiri Krivanek (CZE), Mark Frendo (AUS), Cory Wallace (CAN), Mario Färberböck (AUT), Liesbeth Hessens (BEL).
Winners are grinners (l-r): Paul Mashford (AUS), Adventure Team winners David Stellan and Isaac Tonello (AUS), Jiri Krivanek (CZE), Mark Frendo (AUS), Cory Wallace (CAN), Mario Färberböck (AUT), Liesbeth Hessens (BEL).

“I’ll be back for sure”, Cory Wallace promised instead. “This race is just too much fun, next year I’ll bring more Canadians – they will love this versatile race track!” Jiri Krivanek finished in third in the overall classification and was happy with his performance. “I’ll be back 100% next year as well”, the Czech rider agreed with Wallace.

 

Second overall, Cory Wallace arriving on Grassy Hill.
Second overall, Cory Wallace arriving on Grassy Hill.

Today’s stage was won in a finish sprint on the 30% gradient climb to the top of Grassy Hill, again by the Austrian Benetseder. “Today was a tough one – I could almost not get away from Frendo. He still attacked on the last 200m before the finish, but I managed to get ahead again”, said Benetseder who had won the Cooktown stage winner last year and had been keen to repeat his result.

Liesbeth Hessens dominates womens field

The Belgian adventure racer Liesbeth Hessens has been the undefeated womens stage winner for nine days in a row and takes out the race win. “This was the longest and hardest race I’ve done and I’m so happy that I did so well”, said an emotional Hessens at the finish.

Officials from Cooktown Shire with the race winners (l-r back): Mayor of Cooktown Peter Scott, Fastest Austrlian leader jersey winner Paul Mashford, second Cory Wallace, race winner Mark Frendo, third Jiri Krivanek, Master winner Mario Färberböck and Alan Wilson Councillor Cooktown Shire with the fastest woman, Liesbeth Hessens on top of the world – on Grassy Hill in Cooktown.
Officials from Cooktown Shire with the race winners (l-r back): Mayor of Cooktown Peter Scott, Fastest Austrlian leader jersey winner Paul Mashford, second Cory Wallace, race winner Mark Frendo, third Jiri Krivanek, Master winner Mario Färberböck and Alan Wilson Councillor Cooktown Shire with the fastest woman, Liesbeth Hessens on top of the world – on Grassy Hill in Cooktown.

Organiser Gerhard Schönbacher said that he and his team have already been scouting new and even more exciting race tracks for next year, “The Crocodile Trophy is the toughest mountain bike stage race in the world. We feature a wide variety of stage routes including fun and exciting mountain bike sections as well as less technical yet tough trails and Outback Highways, which challenge the endurance skills of our riders.” The Crocodile Trophy will return to Cairns and Far North Queensland in October 2014.

Top Results – OVERALL:

Overall race victory ELITE Men:

1. Mark Frendo (AUS ) / #12 / Elite / 30:40:17

2. Cory Wallace (CAN) / #2 / Elite / Kona-MBC / 30:52:43 / + 00:12:26

3. Jiri Krivanek (CZE) / #17 / Elite / PRESTIGE / 31:30:58 / + 00:50:41

4. Paul Mashford (AUS) / #5 / Tenni\’s – Cairns Home Loans / 32:22:25 / + 01:42:08

5. Josef Benetseder (AUT) / #5 / Team Eybl / 32:42:47 / + 02:02:30

Overall race victory Women:

1. Liesbeth Hessens (BEL) / #93 / 36:56:23 – 21st Overall

2. Maria Cristina Prati (ITA) / #95 / GS Cicli Matteoni FRW / 45:29:08 / +8:32:45

3. Giordana Sordi (ITA) / #91 / SKYsport-Italy / 45:49:39 / +8:53:16

4. Anne-Mette Mortensen / #92 / Team Fit 4 Run / 51:05:38 / +14:09:1

Race winners age categories:

M1: Mario Färberböck (AUT) / #33 / Bikepalast.com / 31:44:45

M2: Hans Planckaert (BEL) / #40 / Smart Cycling Team / 33:14:48

M3: Peter Selkrig (AUS) / #71 / Il Pastaio Rocky Trail Racing / 34:33:40

Full Results

Download Stage Map

Download Rider List

 

M1 age classification winner and best Austrian in the race, Mario Färberböck from Salzburg.
M1 age classification winner and best Austrian in the race, Mario Färberböck from Salzburg.

 

Cape to Cape MTB Stage 2: Local Knowledge Comes Out on Top

1168 riders streamed out from the starting line at Hamelin Bay this morning for Stage 2 of the Cape to Cape MTB. With the sun shining and a light breeze, conditions were perfect for the second day of the four-day race.

West Australian Peter Hatton used his local knowledge to stamp his authority on this stage, finishing with a time of 2 hours and 32 minutes, a full 2 minutes and 15 seconds ahead of the pack.

Riders battled it out from the start, climbing up a 4km hill out of Hamelin Bay. Winding on and off Caves Road, this was the chance to take it a little easier on the road climb sections before the approaching forest.

The Boranup Forest ride is spectacular, with centuries old Karri forest encasing thrilling single tracks and linking trails.

From the start, there was a tight pack of ten riders setting the pace for the rest of the field and they stuck together right up until reaching Boranup Forrest. After this cracking start, Dwellingup 100 MTB Classic Champion Peter Hatton was in the lead with Stage 1’s 2nd placing Adrian Jackson and 3rd placing Brendan Johnston. The three powered through new course alignments which follow the pristine coastline of Contos Beach, where Hatton stole the opportunity to get in front.

“The three of us got to the beach and it was tough. The sand was really soft so we had to get on and off our bikes, even into the waves a little. But I was lucky enough to get rid of AJ (Adrian Jackson – Merida Flight Centre) on the beach, left only with Trekky (Brendan Johnstone),” said Hatton.

It was here Peter Hatton’s long legs and local knowledge came into play to ultimately power him into the lead.

“I knew this beach was long and the sand would be soft so I knew I had to put my head down here and ultimately managed to get away.”

Hatton charged through the following water crossings in Boranup Forest, full from recent rains within the region – some parts ride-able, some not.

From there, the course wound through some of the South-West’s premier wineries, with Leeuwin Estate and Voyager opening up their properties to the thousand competitors.

Shaun Lewis leads out Andy Blair and a massive chase group. Pete Hatton showed a clean pair of heels and stayed away for the stage win.
Shaun Lewis leads out Andy Blair and a massive chase group. Pete Hatton showed a clean pair of heels and stayed away for the stage win.

“I knew I was gaining a lead but I think it’s good to have a bit of paranoia. Never give up and take for granted that you’re going to win.”

“I was just lucky enough to stay away,” said today’s champ.

Yesterday’s winner, Andy Blair, finished in fourth position today, yet still holds overall first for the Cape to Cape MTB.

“This stage is typically suited to the opportunists that can breakaway, Hatto obviously is a classy rider but I think we gave him a bit of slack. But fair play to him, next thing we knew he was out of sight and we were all racing for second,” said Blair.

 

2012 Cape to Cape MTB Female winner, Jenny Fay, made way back into the top spot after  placing second in Stage 1, beaten by local tri-athlete Jo-Anne Bennett. By the mid-way point, Fay had clawed a 45 second advantage over Jo-Anne Bennet and current Australian cross country champion, Peta Mullens.

“I knew this was the make or break for me. This stage suits my strengths the best but I really had to keep fighting from the beginning. I focused on keeping my head above water and not pressing the panic button,” said Fay.

Jenny states her experience from the 2012 race as an advantage. “I knew when to stay dry and when to shoot through.”

Quadzilla Lewis, Pete You Can Leave Your Hatton, Brendan Mo Johnston and Andy No Bum Blair.
Quadzilla Lewis, Pete You Can Leave Your Hatton, Brendan Mo Johnston and Andy No Bum Blair.

Video: Life Behind Bars – Episode 7 – Big Scars and Exotic Cars

Virgin, Utah is the golden land for MTB zones with huge canyon gaps and step downs.

Brandon Semenuk and Cam Zink get their hands dirty to create epic lines to shred for their film, but find some obstacles along the way. They finish off their motorhome trip by visiting Exotics Racing in Las Vegas to take a spin in a McLaren and Lamborghini for the ultimate rush.

Worlds In the Tropics: Cairns World Cup and World Champs Cross Country Course Preview

“The UCI, and mountain bikers of Australia have an emotional attachment to Cairns, it was a race destination in the nineties, and its soon to become that again”, says Glen Jacobs of World Trail who are the minds and shovels behind the construction of the upcoming World Cup and World Championship courses.

Glen Jacobs and one of his most dedicated machine operators - Ryan de la Rue.
Glen Jacobs and one of his most dedicated trail building machine operators – Ryan De La Rue explain the fine details behind the unique course construction.

At around 90% completion, and currently unrideable, media from around Australia and New Zealand scored an exclusive first peek behind the barriers at what the team have been up to in the last few months in the lead up to April 2014’s World Cup event.

The team needs little introduction, best known for creating the World Champs course in Stromlo Forest Park, Atherton Tablelands, Mount Buller, Falls Creek, Smithfield Mountain Bike Park and a dozen or so more of our sweetest and fun trails around the country. But what makes Glen and his talented team’s return to Cairns more special, is that he was contracted by the UCI back in 1996 to construct the wildly unique and seriously challenging Cairns Worlds course that put Australian mountain bike racing on the international calendar for the first time. It’s on again but this time with over 20 years of experience on many levels behind him and his team. It’s going to be bloody awesome.

The day the barriers are lifted, the public will be free to test out this incredible course, any day of the week.
The day the barriers are lifted, the public will be free to test out this incredible course, any day of the week. With up to seven metres of rain each year, the builders are faced with a real challenge to make a course that doesn’t slide down the hill in the wet season.

“Mountain biking is a part of the culture up here, a lot of places have surf, or snow, while Tropical North Queensland has mountain biking” says Glen, with a strong passion for his home town. “You can’t play squash without a squash court, so once you build trails, people start riding them, and now Cairns is fast becoming a top destination as a result of such incredible trails”.

The World Cup Cross Country Course

This isn’t just any trail to go mountain biking on, building a World Cup course comes attached with many rules, regulations, guidelines and criteria to meet set by the UCI (international cycling body).

This sections dubbed 'Crocslide' is so steep, we had to slide down on our arses. An off camber rock will force you to commit to way more speed than we'd wish for.
This sections dubbed ‘Crocslide’ is so steep we had to slide down on our arses. An off camber rock will force you to commit to way more speed than we’d ever wish for.
Looking back up Crocslide. Yes, it's very intimidating.
Looking back up Crocslide. Yes, it’s very intimidating, like a crocodile perhaps.

Tim Sheedy, Cycling Australia’s newly appointed Technical Director of Mountain Biking was on hand to highlight what they have had to work with. “The criteria is predominantly centred around two fronts; what is best for television – the lap and race duration has a lot to do with that, generally 1 hour 35 minutes and, seven laps if possible. The other is safety, the UCI are overwhelmingly focussed on safety.” says Tim.

Tim Sheedy the new guy at Cycling Australia will make many trips to Cairns over the next while to deliver information to the club, event organisers and trail builders from the UCI's perspective. We like Tim, he has his head around what will make a great event for everyone.
Tim Sheedy the new guy at Cycling Australia will make many trips to Cairns over the next while to deliver information to the Cairns club, event organisers and trail builders from the UCI’s perspective. We like Tim, he has his head around what will make a great event for everyone.
Riders catch glimpses of the bright green and blue waters north of Cairns before hurtling back into the dens jungle for more hectic terrain.
Riders catch glimpses of the refreshing bright green and blue waters north of Cairns before hurtling back into the dense and hostile jungle for more hectic terrain.

Glen and Tim mention what they call ‘VEMASS’, which is an acronym born from the trail side for something that previously had no name – Visually Enhanced Media and Spectator System.

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Joining the dots between interesting terrain features both spectating and rider challenge, the team from World Trail have done a supreme job building the course.
Jump the log, or wall ride?
Jump the log, or wall ride around it? That’s not an old fallen tree, it’s been left on purpose to mess with your wheels and skin.

A VEMASS is a section of the race track that anybody can spectate from and get a taste of the action. A spectator point that brings good vibe and exciting atmosphere, engaging racing for the competitors too, and camera vantage points into a convenient location. Who remembers the Sydney 2000 Olympics? Especially ‘The Cauldron’ section down rocky steps, and up around the other side. It was easy to walk to, and spectators would love the action and feel the noise whether they were mountain bikers themselves or not. It’s going to be a cracker race to watch, from either one meter away, or streamed online in Venezuela.

A VEMASS point, within view of the start finish straight, XC feed zone and expo area.
A VEMASS point under construction within view of the start/finish straight, XC feed zone and big expo area. Check out the moguls and rollers, born out of Glen’s long experience of building four cross tracks on the 90’s World Cup circuit.

We love the fact that the cross country and downhill courses follow much the same route through the tropical jungle as it did in 1996. And for this particular Flow frother, the 1996 Worlds was such a big deal, as an impressionable 14 year old with a worn out VHS recording of the highlights from the race taped from SBS on a Sunday afternoon. We won’t be the only ones reminiscing like mad come April, as a trip to Cairns back in 1996 would have been at the start of many current racer or industry folk careers. It’ll be especially great for internationals to go back to the jungle again.

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Smithfield will return to the international stage once again, but local and visiting riders will also benefit out of all this. With more trails, based around a healthy existing network. Isn’t Glen a smiley fella?

The nostalgia flowed strongly as we walked through sections of the track that were recognisable from all those years ago. Jacobs Ladder is still there but has undergone a serious facelift, making it tougher and with additional line choices galore.

Looking up Jacobs Ladder. check out the 'A line' on the left of the picture! Nailing that line will give you an advantage over a rider going around the long way, but the consequences are high, really high.
Looking up Jacobs Ladder. check out the ‘A line’ on the left of the picture! Nailing that line will give you an advantage over a rider going around the long way, but the consequences are high, really high.
Jacobs Ladder from above, steep switchback turns with inside lines to scare the crap out of you.
Jacobs Ladder from above, steep switchback turns with inside lines to scare the crap out of you.
Keep an eye out for above average sized reptiles crossing the track, and don't stop to pat them.
Keep an eye out for above average sized reptiles crossing the track, and don’t stop to pat them.

The track takes in a wide variety of natural and man-made features, the speeds will be super high overall, and will push the limits of the riders on each turn. We predict that a powerful and punchy rider with the ability to recover extra fast will do well here. The technical nature of the track is well above what we’ve seen in Australia before, not just in negotiating the terrain but line choice and passing tactics will come into play a lot when riders jostle for the top spots.

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If it rains during or before the race, the track will take on a whole new meaning of wild. With the thick jungle canopy locking in moisture to keep the roots and rocks so insanely slippery. Then there is the heat. Cairns is a long way up into the tropical north of Queensland where the air is hot, and thick with humidity. The best riders coming from Europe or America will take some serious acclimation to be able to handle it. Will locals have a big advantage perhaps?

And then if it is bone dry when racing begins, the ground turns into bull dust, making vision and breathing a challenge even further beyond the fluctuating amounts of traction that comes with such a dusty surface. Tropical conditions make for unpredictable weather conditions for the uninitiated, another factor that will give local riders more advantage.

We walked up the climb, which was so steep in sections we struggled to keep forward motion. The obstacles that will be needed to negotiate were both natural and man-made. But you get a sense that riders will suffer, but also be rewarded if the skills and strength levels are high.
We walked up the climb, which was so steep in sections that we struggled to keep forward motion. The obstacles that will be needed to negotiate were around a sweet balance of both natural and man-made features. We got a sense that riders will suffer, but also be rewarded if the skills and strength levels are high enough to make it through sections cleanly.

The weekend ending with April 27, 2014 will be the first official race to be run on this super unique and challenging course. With riders all over the world flying in to wage their bets in the jungle. We’ll be there, so should you.

We had to double check if we were on the downhill or cross country track at more than one point. This big step down jump will be nuts!
We had to double check if we were on the downhill or cross country track at more than one point during the walk. This big step down jump will be nuts! The cameras don’t do it justice right now, which makes us even more eager to see the action begin in April.

2015 will also have a World Cup round on the calendar in Cairns, and the big one in 2017 is the World Championships. It’s going to be huge!

Video: Ashes To Dust

The new MADproductions project with the portuguese pro downhill rider, Emanuel Pombo. Filmed in Catripo track in Ponta do Pargo, Madeira Island.

Emanuel and the MADproductions filmed for two days in one of the most awesome tracks in Madeira. Our Island was crushed by fires, and it’s sad to watch amazing landscapes burned and black. It’s important to warn the populations about the danger of making fires. That’s why we appeal to people to protect our nature.

We try to make a transition from the burned sections to the green forest that survived. Emanuel is a skilled rider and it was a pleasure to work with him onde again !

Video: THULE Gravitate 2013 | Australia’s Biggest MTB Festival

In 2013 Gravitate MTB Festival entered it’s 4th year with the support of THULE. The 4 day event in Cairns showcased FNQ’s jungle trails sporting a mix of events across different disciplines of the sport.

This year saw a revival of our Dual Slalom course after a decade of neglect, a brand new Pump Track and of course, the infamous Sunrise to Sunset DH. The weather blessed the Far North and the event was as successful as ever.

Video: THULE Gravitate 2013 | Australia's Biggest MTB Festival

In 2013 Gravitate MTB Festival entered it’s 4th year with the support of THULE. The 4 day event in Cairns showcased FNQ’s jungle trails sporting a mix of events across different disciplines of the sport.

This year saw a revival of our Dual Slalom course after a decade of neglect, a brand new Pump Track and of course, the infamous Sunrise to Sunset DH. The weather blessed the Far North and the event was as successful as ever.

Cape To Cape MTB Gets Underway! Blair And Bennett Grab Stage 1

Some of the world’s best mountain bike riders today kicked off the sixth annual Cape to Cape MTB with an incredible racing start.

They were joined by over 1,200 riders gathered at the footstep of Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse in Augusta, ready to tackle the 40km first day of the four-day test of endurance.

The iconic Cape Leeuwin Lighthouse and spectacular scenery took a back seat as riders were hit straight up with a 4km climb up Skippy Rock Road before dropping into Augusta’s stately forest. Riders then dropped down onto Deepdene Beach, popping out at Cosy Corner Road before traversing private farmland. A final stretch of tarmac led straight into the finish line at Hamelin Bay.

Dan McConnel and Paul Van Der Ploeg have a laugh about putting sunscreen on Blair's brake rotors.
Dan McConnel and Paul Van Der Ploeg have a laugh about putting sunscreen on Blair’s brake rotors.

It was a tight group that led the stage, with 2011 Cape to Cape champ Andy Blair, four time World MTB Orienteering Champion Adrian Jackson, and 2009 Australian MTB Representative Brendan Johnston riding alongside Shaun Lewis and Mark Tupowski for the first half of the stage. Early on team mate Lewis put in a lot of hard work to help Blair get away and will save his legs to help build upon his lead time again tomorrow.

“It was a really fast start for around the first 20km and the main climb…the three of us just got away,” said Blair. “Those guys were really strong, but when we were pressed at the top of the course, there was a slight reluctance from everyone in the group to do too much work…there was a little bit of looking at each other and I just tried to be patient.”

The trio rode together at the front of the field for the first half of the course, before breaking away. Ultimately though, this stage once again came down to the beach portion of the day’s ride.

Blairy heads up the trio, with AJ and Brendan Johnson on his wheel. Lucky for Andy, Brendan stopped to go fishing and AJ saw a dolphin, giving Blairy the break he needed to get stage one.
Blairy heads up the trio, with AJ and Brendan Johnson on his wheel. Lucky for Andy, Brendan stopped to go fishing and AJ saw a dolphin, giving Blairy the break he needed to get stage one.

“I tried to go as hard as possible without going too hard because I wanted to make the beach my opportunity to get away”, said Blair. “The beach is a bit of a lottery and this year it was carnage. I was lucky enough to get away from Adrian Jackson at the beach.”

It was a case of deja-vu for today’s stage with Blair (Swell Specialized) claiming the leg once again in a time of 1 hour and 37 seconds . Adrian Jackson (Flight Centre Merida) followed Blair across the line around shortly thereafter at 1 hour and 39 minutes. Five time world MTB orienteering champion, Jackson, is in good form and tipped as a possible winner of the 2013 Cape to Cape MTB as he is well known to shine in these big events. Blair charged across the line like it was a sprint finish, knowing every second counts. Blair now only has to mark Adrian Jackson for the next three days and the race could be in the bag.

London 2012 Olympian Dan McConnell worked hard to set up team-mate Brendan Johnston, who crossed the line in third position with a time of 1 hour and 40 minutes.

“I managed to hang onto Blairy and AJ, but on the beach the legs crept up on me…the run off the beach is a good hike and unfortunately I wasn’t able to hang onto Blairy, he’s got longer legs than me”.

“I’ve got some good team mates here and I’m sure they’ll do all they can to help me out to gain some time back on Blairy. Getting time is something that is really hard to do and I don’t know how I’m going to do it but we’ll definitely give it a good crack”.

Cape to Cape MTB defending champion, Irish National TT Champion  and 2011 Real Insurance XCM Series Champion Jenny Fay was beaten across the line by local rider and tri-athlete Jo-Anne Bennett, who crossed the line for the ladies with a time of 02.03.23. Riding in her first Cape to Cape MTB, Bennett competed in the event for the first time.

“Jenny Fay was in front of me until we reached the beach, I jumped off the bike and that’s where my running experience kicked in”, said the Alice Springs Anaconda Enduro Winner and Coffs Harbour Marathon Winner. “From there I caught up on some time and got Jenny in the paddock. I found my second wind, put the hammer down and charged.”

Tomorrow’s stage will see riders leave Hamelin Bay for Xanadu Winery in Margaret River, across 64kms of track.

Video: Desert Sun

Mike Hopkins and James Doerfling are two of the biggest names in big mountain freeriding.

This summer, Mike and I headed up to Williams Lake to sample some of James’ hometown terrain and test out some lines in a big mountain rider’s dream area. The only hitch in our plan was the heat; starting our trip at the end of June, we bore the brunt of summer’s anger, and the desert sun was our primary antagonist. The only thing to be done was try to build early in the mornings and ride as the sun began to set; this made for some good light while shooting, and some long days digging and hiking on the hottest days of the year.

Desert Sun from Absolute Zero on Vimeo.

VOTE NOW: SBS People's Choice Awards

Voting for the 2013 SBS People’s Choice Australian Cyclist of the Year is now open and you have until midnight Wednesday October 30 to cast your vote to help determine the winner.

Everyone who votes will be in the running for a fantastic prize pack, including an official Santini Australian team kit personally signed by the winner along with a brand new Giro Ionos helmet. 

The SBS People’s Choice Australian Cyclist of the Year will be officially presented at the Jayco Australian Cyclist of the Year Awards Dinner at Melbourne’s Crown Entertainment Complex on Friday November 8.

Vote here.

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VOTE NOW: SBS People’s Choice Awards

Voting for the 2013 SBS People’s Choice Australian Cyclist of the Year is now open and you have until midnight Wednesday October 30 to cast your vote to help determine the winner.

Everyone who votes will be in the running for a fantastic prize pack, including an official Santini Australian team kit personally signed by the winner along with a brand new Giro Ionos helmet. 

The SBS People’s Choice Australian Cyclist of the Year will be officially presented at the Jayco Australian Cyclist of the Year Awards Dinner at Melbourne’s Crown Entertainment Complex on Friday November 8.

Vote here.

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Racing: Rolloff World Championships

On the afternoon of Saturday 9 November (3.00pm-4-30pm), Rolloff competitors will turn up at the bottom of Constitution Hill in Bundanoon where the World Championship Rolloff course is 400metres long.

There will be a maximum of 96 competitors. The progression is shown in the table below. You can pre enter the Rolloff World Championships here if that is the only event you intend on participating in, otherwise you can enter as part of your Highland Fling entry. Given the interest generated so far and the limited places, we suggest you sign up as soon as possible.

Registration for the event will take place from 2.00pm outside Bundanoon Post Office opposite Bundanoon Soldiers Memorial Hall. The first heat will roll at 3.15pm.

The High Rollers Final will be contested by the 2 semi final winners plus the Rider who has Rolled the furthest in the heats and quarter finals. Only one rider will emerge as the 2012 Rolloff World Champion; the Rolled Gold winner. Rolled Silver and Rolled Bronze will also be awarded.

Judging of the Championships is the responsibility of the Master of The Rolls and his team.

For more information visit https://www.wildhorizons.com.au/rolloff-world-championships/main-rolloff

FOX Recalls Selected 2013 Model 32 And 34 Evolution Series Forks

With 40 years of suspension innovation for a wide variety of vehicles and disciplines, FOX’s design, engineering, manufacturing, and rigorous quality control tests have allowed us to consistently meet and exceed the industry’s stringent performance testing standards.

The recalled forks comply with CPSC and European safety standards, but at FOX your satisfaction—and more importantly, your safety—is our first concern. While we’ve found that a very small percentage of the approximately 42,000 forks identified in the recall might fail under a set certain circumstances, we feel that the right thing to do is to upgrade all of them.

We apologize in advance for any inconvenience and assure you that the damper upgrade will get you back on the trail safely.

IDENTIFYING YOUR 2013 EVOLUTION SERIES FORK

DO YOU HAVE AN EVOLUTION SERIES FORK?

  • Evolution Series appears on the largest left and right decals

OTHER DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS

  • Fork Colors: Black, White or Green
  • FLOAT
  • Remote or non-remote
  • Travel: 120mm-160mm
  • Decal Colors: Black & White with Silver, Grey, and custom PMS color combinations that are coordinated with the bike’s color scheme

WHAT TO DO

  • Locate the fork’s ID code on the backside of its left lower leg.
  • Enter the ID code in the interactive form at http://ridefox.com/recall
  • You will then be guided through upgrade process step-by-step
  • The next step, if your fork is identified as possibly needing an upgrade, will be to locate the serial number stamped on the underside of the crown. You will need to remove your front wheel to get this information. You may also need to clean this area depending on your bike’s use. If it’s a remote fork, you’ll need to remove the cable hanger to see the entire serial number. Please also note that the numbers 0, 3, and 8 can look very similar.

Video: Kona Factory Team – Shepparton Round 1 VDHS 2013

Callum Morrison takes you on a practice run down the rocky course at Mount Major Shepparton for round 1 of the Kona Victorian Downhill Series.

Tegan Molloy and Cal qualified fastest and Cal who is only sixteen posted a time that would have seen him qualify 13th in Elite men “the boy is quick”. Chris Whitelock took it a little in easy in qualies managing 20th.

In the finals Tegan continued her dominance taking the win by over 15 seconds, and Chris managed to better his position taking 16th. Prior to the U19’s race run the heavens opened seeing the track become quite slick, unfortunately for Cal there was a small mix up with the start list which saw him take off first instead of last. Cal tamed the wet track as best he could however it just wasn’t enough seeing him finish 5th.

All in all it was a great weekend had by all, round 2 will be held in beautiful Granton through the black spur. See you all there.

Kona Factory Team – Australia / Callum Morrison / GoPro Hero 3 / Shepparton Round 1 VDHS 2013 from Ty.Mclean on Vimeo.

Fresh Product: 2014 Commencal META AM 650B Video

None of you friend is keen to shuttle you up the hills? Easily gets up the hill and provide you a killer run down, our AM bikes have no problems taking on the mountains. Your buddies may have a problem though…

META AM 650b : « The » AM bike by excellence and the solution to all your needs: grip, output, speed. Far from marketing buzz and closer to the riders’ needs and riding in the mountains, we adapted our META AM to 650b wheels. Nervousness preserved. Enhanced grip. It still loves pedaling. But would rather aim down the tracks. A real META as we like them with comfort and total fun.

As Remy ABSALON, you want this META as your ally to get another victory on the Mégavalanche in Alpe d’Huez? They are all spec’d race ready, even the Girly. We can swear you that you will have a blast alone or not!

A new format. Perfect for All-Mountain. Pure fun sessions. Alone or not!

META AM 650b 2014 / COMMENCAL All Mountain range from COMMENCAL on Vimeo.

Video: 2013 Act Belong Commit Dwellingup 100 Full Coverage

Extended coverage of the 2013 Act Belong Commit Dwellingup 100 including interviews, results and amazing footage from the 14, 40 and 100 kilometre events.

The Act Belong Commit Dwellingup 100 video is a project of passion, a video made by mountain bikers who just happen to own a video production company. An event put on by mountain bikers for mountain bikers and an event run an managed by TriEvents, WA’s event management specialists and professionals.

There is also a special short story on “Team Charlie” who were the highest fundraisers for Muscular Dystrophy WA’s “Ride For Someone Who Cant”.

For details on entry to next years event visit dwellingup100.com.au

Stages Cycling is headed to Australian and NZ

Stages Cycling is proud to announce a new partnership with FE Sports, a distributor based in Queensland, AU, to bring Stages Power meters to riders in Australia and New Zealand.

“Australia is a massive power meter market and they’ve been hounding us for access to our product,” said Doug Crawford, Stages Cycling’s VP of product development. “It’s been tough to ask them to wait, but we’re happy to announce that the wait is over.

“As with each venture into a new market, we have taken our time to find and vet a distribution partner that matches with our brand ethos and will add value to each rider’s experience with our Stages Cycling product; FE Sports has earned our respect and our partnership. Riders in these markets can expect to find Stages Power meters on the shelves of retailers by November 2013.

“When Stages Power was first announced we knew this was going to be a game-changing product for the power category,” said Danny Brkic, FE Sports’ VP of sales and marketing. “We couldn’t be more excited to partner with Stages Cycling to deliver their product and vision to riders in Australia and New Zealand.”

The crank-based Stages Power meter makes power-based training available to all types of riders through unique design, low weight, and economical price. The new meter, which was launched in North America in 2012, is sold factory installed by Stages Cycling, in Boulder, CO USA to aluminum crank arms from Cannondale, FSA, Shimano, and SRAM.

The Stages Power meter uses strain-gages to measure force and numerous sensors including an accelerometer to measure cadence, eliminating the need for any external accessories or magnets.

Technologically, Stages Cycling leads the power measurement category with cutting edge features including ANT+ and Bluetooth Smart radio transmission, and a factory calibrated automatic temperature compensation system.

These design features have been lauded by riders and media alike, many of which call the new power meter a game changer. On the racecourse, the Stages Power meter has been adopted by all forms of riders, from road racer to mountain biker and enthusiast to world champion.

 

Video: Spoke Magazine – Transition Klunker Review

Issue 53 of Spoke Magazine features our review of the Transition Klunker, an old school style bike which took Spoke reviewer Leif Roy back to his roots in the most terrifying way possible.

Filmed on Wainui’s Spoon Hill trail on a wet slippery day, Leif tests the limits of the bike and his underwear.

Spoke Magazine – Transition Klunker Review from firstfloor on Vimeo.

Racing: Enduro World Series Culminates With Epic Racing And Season-Ending Celebrations

Any concern that the seventh and final round of the Enduro World Series would be anti-climactic was put to rest this weekend with a save-the-best-to-last race hosted by Superenduro at Finale Ligure, Italy.

The overall Series winners, Jerome Clementz (Cannondale Overmountain), Tracy Moseley (TREK Factory Racing) and Junior Martin Maes (GT Factory Racing), already secure after Val d’Isere August 24-25, refused to cruise to the final podium of the year, instead engaging in dramatic stage-by-stage battles to each win the final race as well as their Overall titles.

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Said Enduro World Series Managing Director, Chris Ball, “The riders who could have taken it the easiest this weekend put on the best races ever. It turned out to be an amazing end to the season.”

An historic field of 600 racers from 26 nations took part in the 45km 5 stage race that made the most of the Ligurian Coast’s incredible terrain, from fast flowing woodland trails to technical rocky coastal paths.

The talent pool was deep with pro riders and world champions from all disciplines, ending their seasons on a celebratory note, with top downhillers like Steve Peat and Josh Bryceland electing to finish their competitive year racing their bikes to the beach, 2013 World XC Champion Nino Schurter sharing a starting gate with Red Bull Rampage rider Brendan Fairclough, and Olympic XC racer Marco Aurelio Fontana making his enduro debut. Former 4X World Champion Jared Graves (Yeti Fox) pushed Clementz to the last, and 2013 TransProvence winner Nicolas Lau showed himself a force to be reckoned with, posting times that would have clinched him the win were it not for a one minute time penalty.

The racing culminated in the presentation to Clementz and Moseley of hand-crafted trophies, designed by enduro athlete Anka Martin and her photographer husband Sven, and brought to life by Scottish artisan Simon Muir. Designed from exotic hardwoods to represent the Enduro World Series logo, the trophies have eight tiny compartments each containing a relic from one of the race destinations: soil from Punta Ala, Italy, alpine rock from Val d’Allos, France a bottle of Genepe from Les 2 Alpes, France, bark and aspen leaves from Winter Park, Colorado, old man’s beard moss from Whistler, BC, white organic linen from Val d’Isere, France to symbolize the white-out conditions, and fresh hazelnuts sand from the beach of Finale Ligure. A final compartment remains as an empty invitation for the two champions to add a personal memento from their year of racing.

Said Ball of the first year for the Enduro World Series, “It has exceeded anything I could have dreamed off. It’s been a roller-coaster of a year, and we have a huge amount of input from the riders and teams as we move forward. We’ve learned a lot. But this final race and the amazing vibe here this weekend has absolutely motivated us to push on.”

Full results can be found here: EWS7_Final Results

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Racing: Final Round Of Enduro World Series Touches Down In Finale Ligure, Italy

For the world’s best and most passionate mountain bikers, all roads lead to Finale Ligure on the Italian Riviera this weekend, for the final round of the Enduro World Series.

An historic field of 600 racers from 26 nations will take to the trails of the Ligurian Coast for two days of racing to crown the first Enduro World Series Champions.

The talent pool is deep with pro riders and world champions from all disciplines, with a starting list boasting the likes of Jerome Clementz, Tracy Moseley, Jared Graves, Fabien Barel, Cedric Gracia, Anne Caroline Chausson, Martin Maes, Dan Atherton, Tanja Zakelj, Brendan Fairclough, Steve Peat, Josh Bryceland, and Justin Leov, in addition to top XC racers Marco Aurelio Fontana and Nino Schurter making their Enduro World Series debut. The winner of the 2013 Superenduro circuit, currently a battle between Manuel Ducci and Davide Sottocornola, will also be decided this weekend.

The 6 stage course, which was announced Wednesday October 16, will feature 2300m in climbing and descending over approximately 60km, incorporating every type of terrain in the region, from fast flowing woodland trails to technical rocky coastal paths.

The two day Superenduro powered by SRAM event caps off an epic season for global enduro mountain biking that began just 5 months ago in Punta Ala, Italy, and travelled to Val d’Allos and Crankworx Les 2 Alpes in France, Colorado’s Winter Park, Crankworx Whistler, and Val d’Isere.

As Superenduro co-founder and host, Enrico Guala says, this final round takes place less than a year after the Enduro World Series was created, conceived to unite the world’s enduro mountain bike community. “360 days later, we are hosting the most incredible group of mountain bikers coming from all disciplines and backgrounds for the most exciting event the sport has witnessed,” says Guala.

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Women And Girls Urged To ‘Have A Go’ At Mountain Biking

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher launched the 2014 Dirt de Femme on Wednesday, 16th October – a series of mountain biking events for women and girls at Stromlo Forest Park, to encourage women and girls to ‘have a go’ at mountain biking in a fun, competitive environment.

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Dirt de Femme distances are between 20 and 25 kilometres and are open to all female cyclists aged 10 years and above, with three mountain biking events taking place on 16 February, 30 March and 4 May.

“Canberra has the highest rates of female mountain bike participation in Australia and with some fantastic mountain biking trails, this event is a great opportunity to get involved in the sport,” the Chief Minister said.

“While many female cyclists enjoy being challenged in a competitive atmosphere, an official race can be intimidating for some people, and the Dirt de Femme provides a fun and supportive environment in which to participate.

“Over 250 women and girls took part in the 2013 Dirt de Femme – more than double the participants in 2012. This shows the growing enthusiasm for mountain biking amongst women in Canberra.
“The support and presence of past winners and other cycling role models is a vital ingredient for nurturing a passion for the sport in young girls and there’s no greater motivator than aspiring to be a champion and being able to follow the path of your hero.

“Cycling is great for health and fitness and with thousands of Canberrans today donning their helmets for ‘Ride 2 Work’ day, it is great to see targeted events like the Dirt de Femme see even more Canberrans – young and old – develop a passion for physical activities like this,” the Chief Minister concluded.

The 2014 Dirt de Femme is organised by Canberra-based company Cycle Education. For more information or to register for the Dirt de Femme, visit www.cycleducation.com.au

Women And Girls Urged To 'Have A Go' At Mountain Biking

ACT Chief Minister Katy Gallagher launched the 2014 Dirt de Femme on Wednesday, 16th October – a series of mountain biking events for women and girls at Stromlo Forest Park, to encourage women and girls to ‘have a go’ at mountain biking in a fun, competitive environment.

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Dirt de Femme distances are between 20 and 25 kilometres and are open to all female cyclists aged 10 years and above, with three mountain biking events taking place on 16 February, 30 March and 4 May.

“Canberra has the highest rates of female mountain bike participation in Australia and with some fantastic mountain biking trails, this event is a great opportunity to get involved in the sport,” the Chief Minister said.

“While many female cyclists enjoy being challenged in a competitive atmosphere, an official race can be intimidating for some people, and the Dirt de Femme provides a fun and supportive environment in which to participate.

“Over 250 women and girls took part in the 2013 Dirt de Femme – more than double the participants in 2012. This shows the growing enthusiasm for mountain biking amongst women in Canberra.
“The support and presence of past winners and other cycling role models is a vital ingredient for nurturing a passion for the sport in young girls and there’s no greater motivator than aspiring to be a champion and being able to follow the path of your hero.

“Cycling is great for health and fitness and with thousands of Canberrans today donning their helmets for ‘Ride 2 Work’ day, it is great to see targeted events like the Dirt de Femme see even more Canberrans – young and old – develop a passion for physical activities like this,” the Chief Minister concluded.

The 2014 Dirt de Femme is organised by Canberra-based company Cycle Education. For more information or to register for the Dirt de Femme, visit www.cycleducation.com.au

Video: Life On Wheels – Trailer

Seven months of filming, 3TB of footage, 10 countries and countless travelling miles later and Life on Wheels presented by Creative Concept, Cycles Lapierre and Pure Agency is almost ready for release.

Following the Lapierre Gravity Republic team on their 2013 UCI World Cup and World Championship season, this film is about the characters and personalities behind who makes the team tick. From the riders to the mechanics and the management, everyone plays a part as we find out from the inside what the team is really like.

Starring Sam Blenkinsop, Loic Bruni, Emmeline Ragot and Loris Vergier and directed by Aaron Bartlett, part 1 of Life on Wheels is coming to a computer screen near you for free online release on the 6th November.

Life on Wheels – Official Trailer 2013 from PureAgency on Vimeo.

Video: The Road From Karakol

In summer 2011, Outdoor Research athlete Kyle Dempster took off on his bike across Kyrgyzstan with a couple mostly-accurate maps, a trailer full of climbing gear, and a vocabulary of 10 Kyrgyz words.

He spent two months pedaling and pushing the bike more than 1200 km on roads of variable states of neglect, wading through wild rivers, dealing with corrupt military checkpoint staff, and soloing a handful of unclimbed alpine rock and mixed routes. He recorded the journey, his camera his only partner, friend, and sometimes the only receiving end of his conversations for days at a time.

In 2013, Kyle’s self-shot footage of his journey in Kyrgyzstan made it to the desk of filmmakers Fitz Cahall and Austin Siadak, who were asked to look at the footage and see if there might be enough to chop together a 4-minute climbing film. They saw a lot more potential in it, and turned it into the 25-minute “The Road From Karakol,” which debuted at the 5Point Film Festival and took home the Best In Fest award.

The Road From Karakol from Outdoor Research on Vimeo.

Racing: Croc Trophy Sees 15 Nations Gather in Far North Queensland

The 19th Crocodile Trophy starts this Saturday with a lap race at Smithfield in Cairns. As the world’s oldest mountain bike stage race the Crocodile Trophy has become known as the hardest and most adventurous event. This year more than 80 riders will race for 900 km through the Outback and the rain forests in Queensland’s Tropical North including Canadian’s National Marathon Champion, Cory Wallace, last year’s third finisher Wolfgang Krenn from Austria and Lotto Belisol pro-team rider, Sander Cordeel from Belgium.

Cory Wallace from Canada is just one of the big names in attendance this year.
Cory Wallace from Canada is just one of the big names in attendance this year.

Organisers of the Crocodile Trophy confirmed today that Sander Cordeel, pro-road cyclist from the Belgian Lotto Belisol team will be at the start line in Cairns this week. En-route from the Tour of Beijing Cordeel will arrive in Cairns just in time to race the first stage’s lap race at Smithfield MTB Park on Saturday, 19 October. “I was chatting with my team mate Adam Hansen about the Crocodile Trophy the other day and he talked me into signing up,” Sander Cordeel said of his last-minute decision to travel to Australia for the nine-day stage race through the Outback of Far North Queensland. “It has always been my dream to do this race”, the 25-year old road cyclist added.

Hot weather conditions, rough terrain and the images of racers pedalling towards the horizon on endless Outback Highways have characterised the race coverage since the event’s inception two decades ago. This year the event promises again to be a challenging stage race, “Part of the Crocodile Trophy fascination is the sheer adventure that our riders will experience. We will be showcasing some of the best mountain bike trails in the Cairns region and cross the Atherton-Mareeba Tablelands to take them deep into the Australian Outback.”

The remote Outback town Irvinebank and the Mt Mulligan cattle station will be two of the stage destinations next week before the riders and more than 80 supporters and crew arrive at the historic gold-mining town of Laura, where an individual time trial will add to the challenge on day seven.

This is where everyone's aiming for! The finish atop Grassy Hill in Cooktown, 900km after first departing Cairns.
This is where everyone’s aiming for! The finish atop Grassy Hill in Cooktown, 900km after first departing Cairns.

The strongest international contenders for the win this year are Canadian’s National Marathon Champion, Cory Wallace, who already has two 5th places at the Crocodile Trophy to his name and last year’s third place getter Wolfgang Krenn from Austria, who also sees the Czech rider Jan Fojtik as a major competitor. “Cory Wallace and Jan Fojtik are my main opponents, I think this year. The Crocodile Trophy is a tough event, you have to be ready for anything”, Krenn said of his competition. Also Cory Wallace is ready to claim this year’s win, “I expect a lot of high end competition from both Australia and Europe at the Croc this year and will be ready to battle whoever shows up!”

After a stop-over at the Aboriginal community of Hopevale on day eight, the Crocodile Trophy will finish in Cooktown on Sunday, 27 October with rewarding ocean views and the Great Barrier Reef from the top of Grassy Hill. For more event information, visit www.crocodile-trophy.com

 

Video: Adam Billinghurst – One Million Down

Mountain bikers seem to have an unwavering desire to challenge how far they can push their limits. For some, it means jumping farther. For others, it means riding a line that terrifies them. For Whistler legend Adam Billinghurst, it meant attempting to descend one million vertical feet as quickly as possible.

Watch Adam Billinghurst in One Million Down as he takes on one of his life goals of achieving 1 million vertical feet on his bike. “I’ve wanted to ride 1,000,000 vertical feet in the bike park for almost 10 years now. You don’t get to do a million of a lot of things. The things you do, you rarely think about: how many breaths you’ve taken, grains of rice you’ve eaten, said the word ‘and’. It just seemed like a good number.”