Racing Downhill in China’s GuiDe National Geopark

Bart Moore and Dennis Beare on a steep section of the DH course.

On the 13th of August 2017, GuiDe National Geopark partnered with the Qinghai Sports Association to hold the second TDRY GuiDe Geopark International Downhill Race. With over 110 participants from more than 12 different countries around the world invited, this event is setting a solid foundation for the future of gravity-based mountain biking in the Qinghai Province.

Reece Potter on his way to victory.
A local rider on a steep part of the track.

The GuiDe National Geo park sits at 2,260m above sea level and is listed in the Top 100 enterprises of China Tourism. It covers a huge 554 square kilometres of breathtaking scenery. To put the scale of this into perspective, that’s less than 100sqkm smaller than the USA’s famous Grand Canyon National Park. GuiDe National Geopark will become a World-Class centre of cultural tourism within 5 years, according to their future plans.

Elliot Smith and François Pedemanaud on the 2X course.

This year’s race had 4 different groups of DH riding (International elite, Domestic elite, Domestic open and Female Elite) and 2 groups (International Elite and Domestic) to battle it out on the new and improved 2X course. With a prize pool adding up to 236,000RMB – that’s over $35,000 USD!!- it was a race not to be missed!

Elliot Smith, foot out through deep dust.

For its second year, the Downhill course was extended in length by around 100 metres making it just over 1km. This extension was on top of dramatic changes to improve the flow of the trail and the addition of technical features. Don’t let the fastest times of around 1.15 fool you; the track was exhausting with back to back features, steep chutes and the natural dusty terrain.  With only one day of practice, the track continued to surprise riders throughout the weekend. With varying conditions over the event including short bursts of pouring rain, strong winds and blistering sun in between, riders were certainly kept on their toes. Luckily Sunday, race day, brought beautiful sunny weather and light winds for all racers to come down the mountain smoothly.

Epic battle between Aiden Varley and Elliot Smith.

The International Elite race was won by Reece Potter from New Zealand, followed dangerously close by Matej Chavat from the Czech Republic, Elliot Smith from Australia, Taha Ghabeli from Iran and Takuya Aoki from Japan. Some very competitive times were posted by the Domestic Elite group with Sihan Jiang on top, followed by Cong Xiao and Mengqi Tang. Bella Chen from Germany took the win in the Women’s Elite field, with Jiling Cai and Zhishuai Zhang from China in 2nd and 3rd position.

Reece Potter and Matej Charvat.

The 2X race was such an entertaining event! Having 2 riders at a time battling head-to-head over 6 jumps, berms and 2 sets of stairs provided constant jaw-dropping entertainment. This year, both groups rode the same course where the jumps had been beefed up jumps which were widened significantly and rode with effortless flow, allowing for some intense side-by-side riding, constant overtaking and close finishes. Matej Charvat dominated the event and shared the podium with Aiden Varley and Elliot Smith.

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

Our company, TrailScapes was contracted to improve and extend the courses from the previous year as well as to invite riders from all over the world to compete in this amazing setting. Being an international company based in Australia and specialising in MTB trail design and construction, we travel constantly around Australia and Asia but we can honestly say that this experience was one-of-a-kind! We would like to thank all the riders who participated in this well-run, professional event.

For info and updates on next year’s race and other races in Asia that we’re involved in, you can follow us on Facebook or Instagram.


Lunch with a view.
Raking and baking in China.
Friendly locals.

Fresh Product: Rake N Bake – Adelaide Made Trail Tools

Born out of the frustration from too many tools bending and breaking, Adelaide trail design and construction company founder Garry Patterson set to make the toughest and versatile tools that they could rely on. Specifically aimed at building mountain bike trails, these are not your average rake hoe.

Rake N Bake 5
The right tool for the job, the Rake N Bake ain’t messing around.

“We could not accept that the current rakes were bending and breaking with their first use and that having to repair the tools after each work day was normal.”

The fire rake or rake hoe, is the number one tool for any trail builder and there’s no doubt it gets a workout, especially in rocky terrain so it didn’t make much sense that it was made from average quality steel. So after a few beers, the Rake N Bake and Half Baked were born on a scrap piece of paper.

Rake N Bake 12
Multi-purpose versatility with mountain biking trails in mind.

The aim was to design two tools:

  1. An incredibly versatile smaller tool that was easy to carry and suited for a range of tasks: Like doing the back cut, raking vegetation, chopping small roots, compacting, etc. It would end up being called the Half Baked and is the weapon of choice for trail maintenance.

Rake N Bake 14
The lighter and smaller trail maintenance tool – Half Baked.

  2. The toughest, ultimate trail building hand tool, perfect for cutting fresh trail, and shaping and compacting. This one has become the number one seller – the Rake N Bake.

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The big one – Rake N Bake.

They’re supplied to some of the best professional trail building companies and trail builders around the world, volunteer groups, and anyone who likes to dig trails. They’ve also been popular with fire crews, landscapers and four-wheel drive enthusiasts.

[divider]Manufacturing Details[/divider]

We are very proud of the fact that our tools are entirely made in Australia of Australian materials.

The head is made of mining and military spec bisalloy steel (high strength steel) and the handle of Australian hardwood spotted gum.

Manufacturing anything in our country competitively is challenging but the belief that doing it any other way would compromise product quality. So here’s how these babies are made.

First, we buy the steel and have it laser-cut by the southern hemisphere’s biggest laser-cutter which is conveniently located in South Australia. 

Then it goes to the machinist, also in South Australia, who bevels the edges and who also happens to manufacture parts for some of the world’s leading motorsport teams despite operating out of an unsuspecting rusty tin shed. 

Rake N Bake 20
Welded in Adelaide.

The rake heads then travel to in-house welder and Australian free-riding legend Dean Modridge who does all the final welding and jigging.

The custom handles are made in Queensland of Australian hardwood spotted gum.

If shipping is required, quick assembly is all you need. Put the handle in the rake head and tighten the nut and supplied bolt.

The result, after 7 different versions of the Rake N Bake and 6 versions of the Half Baked; the toughest and best trail building tools the Trailscapes team had ever used. And it turns out they weren’t the only ones to think so, the word got out and are now shipping them all over the world, from Australia to Norway, Belgium, Bulgaria, Switzerland and Indonesia.

Both have an ‘in-built’ bottle opener too, perhaps this attribute is the main reason people buy them.

New Trail Preview: Serrata Track – Bantry Bay, NSW

“One of the things people always say, is that National Parks don’t want change,” says Garry Patterson of TrailScapes, “but this project has really proved to me that’s not true.”

TrailScapes are the crew charged with the challenging, highly-pivotal task of creating NSW’s first ever purpose-built mountain bike trail in a National Park area. “From our perspective, National Parks have been amazing to work with – there are crew within Parks who want to ride this trail even more than we do! – and nothing has ever been too hard for them,” says Garry.

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 2
Garry Patterson of TrailScapes. He should be proud of his work!

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The trail in discussion is one of two brand-new trails (yes, completely new, commissioned by National Parks themselves) in Garigal National Park, in Sydney’s northern suburbs. This is an area where mountain biking is booming. It’s also an area of vast swathes of sensitive National Park, countless sites of Aboriginal significance and plenty of residents who like things ‘just-so’. As such, it has taken some serious vision, determination and political will on the part of the NSW government and the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service to make this project a reality. Everyone involved deserves heaped servings of praise!

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 32
The return climb to the top of the trail is easy, straight up the fireroad.

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 1

While the official opening is still a few days away, Flow was given a chance to ride the fresh Serrata Track with TrailScapes yesterday. This is a unique trail in so many ways; because of the sensitive nature of the terrain, the entire trail has been hand-built, which is a mammoth undertaking in such a rocky environment.  Materials for trail construction had to be sourced locally and either carried in by hand or dropped by helicopter. Trees of over 50mm in diameter had to preserved too. In short, this was not your standard machine-built trail project!

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 8
TrailScapes moved a lot of rock, by hand, to make this trail happen! With so much of the trail on rock, it should hold up exceptionally well.
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It’s nice to see a trail with line choice options; there are at least three different lines through this particular section of rocky trail.

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But TrailScapes have done an incredible job, and ultimately these restriction have resulted in a trail that is both unique amongst most new trail developments, but which also matches the vibe and feel of other trails in Sydney’s northern beaches region. The trail is almost entirely built of rock, either on the sandstone bedrock itself, or with long sections of rock armouring linking up cool ledges and other rock features. Rated as a ‘blue’ intermediate level trail, there are plenty of properly technical sections that’ll prompt many riders to take pause, with multiple line choices available, including some that aren’t so obvious until you really stop and take a look.

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Tony Nolan, the father of Australian mountain bike photography, has been involved in the construction of the Serrata Track. It’s actually pretty special to have someone so influential in the history of Australian mountain biking involved in this project.
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Rocky, steep, beautiful terrain.

While the Serrata Track is just on 1.5km long, it’s an easy to rip out multiple laps, with the return climb cruising back up a mellow fireroad. And when you combine this trail in with the recently refurbished Manly Dam (just around the corner) and with  2.15km Gahnia trail opening soon, you’ve suddenly got a pretty healthy mountain bike trail network. We’re incredibly excited to see this project so close to completion; it feels as if the discussion about legal trails in Garigal National Park has been going on for decades, and to have it actually come into fruition is just brilliant. We hope this project marks the start of a new era of positive relations between mountain bikers and NSW National Parks.

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 22
Again, there are multiple line options – steep and quick, or round the outside.

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 18 Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 23

Serrata Track - Bantry Bay 6

Please note: the Garnia Trail is NOT yet open. Riding it ahead of the official opening date could seriously jeopardise this and future projects. And do you really want to be the d#ckhead who stuffs it up for everyone? 

Location: The Serrata Track starts off the Currie Rd firetrail, in Forestville. The trailhead is approximately 1 km in from Currie Rd – you can’t miss it.

Australia’s Busiest Trail: Manly Dam Scores an Upgrade.

Manly Dam is the most used trail not just in Sydney, but Australia, with approximately 150,000 uses a year, and up to 500 passes in one day! Despite this, the iconic 10km loop has seen better days. Eroding trail, track widening and confusing line choices are all features of the loop that riders have had to face for some time.

It’s rough, it’s bumpy, muddy and scratchy out there, it’s a fast ride, with loads of fun, swooping turns and drop offs everywhere.

The Sydney sandstone terrain exists in one of two surfaces, either hard steps of rock or soft patches of sand under your tyres, making it a serious challenge to ride, maintain and reduce massive erosion after rain. It’s also so unique and localised to a small area, so its hard to find anybody with experience working with the

Enter Trailscapes, the South Australian trail building and maintenance team headed up by Garry Patterson, a longtime and passionate mountain biker himself, with massive experience internationally and domestically in the business of trail building. The crew are currently hard at work in two areas; Manly Dam and across the road at Bantry Bay in Garigal National Park.

Whilst the work at Manly Dam is exciting news, what’s possibly even more exciting is the new trails being cut in across the road from Manly Dam at Bantry Bay. National Park? Yes, mountain bike trails are being constructed from scratch in National Park land, marking what is hopefully the beginning of a more positive relationship between mountain bikers and National Parks. For a long time there has been advocacy efforts to get trails at the site, NPWS is committed to providing quality, sustainable mountain biking experiences in selected New South Wales parks and reserves a commitment articulated in the NPWS Sustainable Mountain Biking Strategy. A priority project in the Strategy is the provision of a quality and sustainable mountain bike track in a northern Sydney NPWS reserve. With clearance from what we hear is the top level of state parliament, two brand new trails are being built, a blue graded trail ‘Bantry Bay West’ looping from the Currie Road Trail to the Cook Street Trail and a blue graded trail ‘Bantry Bay East’ looping from the Bluff Trail to the Engravings Trail. For more information click this link.

Warringah Council, which manages Manly Dam, has been a great supporter of the sport and has taken a collaborative approach to ensure the mountain biking community had input into the project.

The first stage of upgrade works costs $95,000 showing a real investment in mountain biking and protecting the environment.

Council has committed more funding over the next four years to continue the trail upgrade works that were identified during in the trail audit process.

Flow dropped by to see how the work is going, and meet the trail fairies in their office.

  • How have Trailscapes come to be working at Manly Dam?

We were contacted about four months ago by Warringah Council about doing some restoration/repair work on the trail, and then we started work about two months ago.

  • Why the need for a big operation like this?

As Manly Dam is one of the most popular mountain biking destinations not just in Sydney, but Australia, it gets worn down greatly. There has been a need for some time for more sustainable trail features to be put in place to accommodate the high traffic the area receives.

  • What can Trailscapes offer in contrast to regular Manly Dam/National Park maintenance teams?

Trailscapes can offer a better standard of work, as we are a professional trail building/maintenance company with vast experience in the specific industry of creating and maintaining mountain bike trails.

  • What is the main focus for the work to be undertaken?

There are four sections that we are focusing on. Putting in official A/B lines at the section known as ’19th Hole’, making A/B lines on ‘The Sniggle’, and finally we will be removing unsustainable trail features and replacing them with more future-proofed materials.

  • Are there any working conditions that effect the work being done here?

Well there’s a rider that comes through every ten minutes, even on a weekday (laughs).

  • What is the best part about working in the Manly Dam area?

The terrain here is just so unique. It’s amazing, and unlike anything else I’ve seen in Australia.

  • What’s the timeframe for the work to be completed?

Manly Dam: Late July

Bantry Bay West: Fire trail green with single track section blue (IMBA difficulty rating). Expected completion by October 2014

Bantry Bay East: Fire trail green with single track section blue (IMBA difficulty rating). Expected completion by February 2015

  • Will there continue to be more work done in the future or is this a once off operation?

The work we’re doing is predicted to have a ten year lifespan. Despite this, there are plenty of avenues for work to be done on the Manly Dam trail so we will most probably be back. With the complementing trail network being developed across the road at Bantry Bay, this area is about to become even more popular for mountain biking then it already is so who knows if we could be building more trails in the near future!

[divider]Manly Dam[/divider]

The bulk of the work will include:

  1. Introducing signposted A and B lines at technical sections of the trail. These include ‘the 19th hole’ and the steep roll off located on before the golf course lookout.

  2. Putting in more sustainable trail features, like using locally sourced Sydney sandstone instead of the previously used Dutch Ladders to prevent erosion of the trail.

Trailscapes 1
The Dam is littered with sensitive sections with moist surfaces.
Trailscapes 2
Cya later Dutch ladders! We won’t miss you.
Trailscapes 3
Garry’s favourite tool.

Trailscapes 5

Trailscapes 6
“If you build proper trails there’ll be less illegal stuff-it’s that simple”
Trailscapes 10
When Elliot isn’t working on the trail, you can find him backflipping at the dirt jumps. All the crew ride the trails the love to build.

Trailscapes 11

Trailscapes 13

Trailscapes 14
This is what 80 riders in one hour can do to sandstone.

Trailscapes 15

Trailscapes 16

Trailscapes 18

Trailscapes 19
“When you start from scratch with a trail everyone says ‘that’s great’, but if you tamper with existing trails it’s easy to get people upset, so you’ve got to consider your impact”

Trailscapes 20

Trailscapes 21
Sandstone materials handpicked from Gosford Quarries just north of Sydney are being placed over the soft patches of the trails to armour the surface for longevity.

Trailscapes 24

Trailscapes 26
Gary proudly unveils a new ‘B line’.
Trailscapes 28
“The work we are doing is mainly remedial, as well as putting in some A and B lines” said Gary. “We want a first time rider to easily identify the easiest line choice, and more experienced riders to have a more challenging line to ride”.

Trailscapes 29

Trailscapes 30

Trailscapes 31

[divider]Two New Trails For Bantry Bay[/divider]

The Bantry Bay trail locations are yet to be revealed, but do get excited it’s going to be a great addition to the existing trails of Manly Dam to provide a bigger loop network.

Trailscapes 34
Trail building is serious business! Tony suits up for battle.

Trailscapes 35

Trailscapes 36

Trailscapes 37
Tony Nolan, who’s been riding Manly Dam since 1995 and is currently working on the new trails at Bantry Bay, couldn’t keep the grin off his face discussing the future of the new trails at Bantry Bay and remedial work at Manly Dam.
Trailscapes 38
Yet more protection. It’s tough work day in, day out.
Trailscapes 39
“You just don’t use a wheelbarrow of dirt and you’re done”
Trailscapes 40
The Bantry Bay Trailscapes crew. Just one happy family.

 

Trailscapes 50
The surfaces are capped with only locally sourced materials, under strict guidance from National Parks.

Trailscapes 49

Trailscapes 48
It’s going to be a nice riding trail, quite tight and twisty through the beautiful National Park.
Trailscapes 47
Maite Petrement, full time trail builder with one of her favourite sections of trail.
Trailscapes 46
The trail work at Bantry Bay isn’t easy, the location is so remote that helicopters have been used to drop supplies such as rocks and dirt near the site.
Trailscapes 45
The time has come Sydney. Fresh, legal trails on the way!

Trailscapes 44

Trailscapes 43
Watch your head! These bags aren’t light!
Trailscapes 42
Trails don’t build themselves! Tony showing his team how it’s done with the mattock! “All of these trails are going to be amazing to ride,” said Tony.

 

Australia's Busiest Trail: Manly Dam Scores an Upgrade.

Riders who frequent Manly Dam either love it, hate it or find the challenging terrain a bit off-putting. The incredibly popular trail in Sydney’s Northern Beaches around the old water reservoir just a few km from the vibrant Manly Beach has long been in need of some care and maintenance. Judging by the number of hire bikes we see also around The Dam, it’s also a must-ride destination for beginners to the sport and visitors to Sydney.

Manly Dam is the most used trail not just in Sydney, but Australia, with approximately 150,000 uses a year, and up to 500 passes in one day! Despite this, the iconic 10km loop has seen better days. Eroding trail, track widening and confusing line choices are all features of the loop that riders have had to face for some time.

It’s rough, it’s bumpy, muddy and scratchy out there, it’s a fast ride, with loads of fun, swooping turns and drop offs everywhere.

The Sydney sandstone terrain exists in one of two surfaces, either hard steps of rock or soft patches of sand under your tyres, making it a serious challenge to ride, maintain and reduce massive erosion after rain. It’s also so unique and localised to a small area, so its hard to find anybody with experience working with the

Enter Trailscapes, the South Australian trail building and maintenance team headed up by Garry Patterson, a longtime and passionate mountain biker himself, with massive experience internationally and domestically in the business of trail building. The crew are currently hard at work in two areas; Manly Dam and across the road at Bantry Bay in Garigal National Park.

Whilst the work at Manly Dam is exciting news, what’s possibly even more exciting is the new trails being cut in across the road from Manly Dam at Bantry Bay. National Park? Yes, mountain bike trails are being constructed from scratch in National Park land, marking what is hopefully the beginning of a more positive relationship between mountain bikers and National Parks. For a long time there has been advocacy efforts to get trails at the site, NPWS is committed to providing quality, sustainable mountain biking experiences in selected New South Wales parks and reserves a commitment articulated in the NPWS Sustainable Mountain Biking Strategy. A priority project in the Strategy is the provision of a quality and sustainable mountain bike track in a northern Sydney NPWS reserve. With clearance from what we hear is the top level of state parliament, two brand new trails are being built, a blue graded trail ‘Bantry Bay West’ looping from the Currie Road Trail to the Cook Street Trail and a blue graded trail ‘Bantry Bay East’ looping from the Bluff Trail to the Engravings Trail. For more information click this link.

Warringah Council, which manages Manly Dam, has been a great supporter of the sport and has taken a collaborative approach to ensure the mountain biking community had input into the project.

The first stage of upgrade works costs $95,000 showing a real investment in mountain biking and protecting the environment.

Council has committed more funding over the next four years to continue the trail upgrade works that were identified during in the trail audit process.

Flow dropped by to see how the work is going, and meet the trail fairies in their office.

  • How have Trailscapes come to be working at Manly Dam?

We were contacted about four months ago by Warringah Council about doing some restoration/repair work on the trail, and then we started work about two months ago.

  • Why the need for a big operation like this?

As Manly Dam is one of the most popular mountain biking destinations not just in Sydney, but Australia, it gets worn down greatly. There has been a need for some time for more sustainable trail features to be put in place to accommodate the high traffic the area receives.

  • What can Trailscapes offer in contrast to regular Manly Dam/National Park maintenance teams?

Trailscapes can offer a better standard of work, as we are a professional trail building/maintenance company with vast experience in the specific industry of creating and maintaining mountain bike trails.

  • What is the main focus for the work to be undertaken?

There are four sections that we are focusing on. Putting in official A/B lines at the section known as ’19th Hole’, making A/B lines on ‘The Sniggle’, and finally we will be removing unsustainable trail features and replacing them with more future-proofed materials.

  • Are there any working conditions that effect the work being done here?

Well there’s a rider that comes through every ten minutes, even on a weekday (laughs).

  • What is the best part about working in the Manly Dam area?

The terrain here is just so unique. It’s amazing, and unlike anything else I’ve seen in Australia.

  • What’s the timeframe for the work to be completed?

Manly Dam: Late July

Bantry Bay West: Fire trail green with single track section blue (IMBA difficulty rating). Expected completion by October 2014

Bantry Bay East: Fire trail green with single track section blue (IMBA difficulty rating). Expected completion by February 2015

  • Will there continue to be more work done in the future or is this a once off operation?

The work we’re doing is predicted to have a ten year lifespan. Despite this, there are plenty of avenues for work to be done on the Manly Dam trail so we will most probably be back. With the complementing trail network being developed across the road at Bantry Bay, this area is about to become even more popular for mountain biking then it already is so who knows if we could be building more trails in the near future!

[divider]Manly Dam[/divider]

The bulk of the work will include:

  1. Introducing signposted A and B lines at technical sections of the trail. These include ‘the 19th hole’ and the steep roll off located on before the golf course lookout.

  2. Putting in more sustainable trail features, like using locally sourced Sydney sandstone instead of the previously used Dutch Ladders to prevent erosion of the trail.

Trailscapes 1
The Dam is littered with sensitive sections with moist surfaces.
Trailscapes 2
Cya later Dutch ladders! We won’t miss you.
Trailscapes 3
Garry’s favourite tool.

Trailscapes 5

Trailscapes 6
“If you build proper trails there’ll be less illegal stuff-it’s that simple”
Trailscapes 10
When Elliot isn’t working on the trail, you can find him backflipping at the dirt jumps. All the crew ride the trails the love to build.

Trailscapes 11

Trailscapes 13

Trailscapes 14
This is what 80 riders in one hour can do to sandstone.

Trailscapes 15

Trailscapes 16

Trailscapes 18

Trailscapes 19
“When you start from scratch with a trail everyone says ‘that’s great’, but if you tamper with existing trails it’s easy to get people upset, so you’ve got to consider your impact”

Trailscapes 20

Trailscapes 21
Sandstone materials handpicked from Gosford Quarries just north of Sydney are being placed over the soft patches of the trails to armour the surface for longevity.

Trailscapes 24

Trailscapes 26
Gary proudly unveils a new ‘B line’.
Trailscapes 28
“The work we are doing is mainly remedial, as well as putting in some A and B lines” said Gary. “We want a first time rider to easily identify the easiest line choice, and more experienced riders to have a more challenging line to ride”.

Trailscapes 29

Trailscapes 30

Trailscapes 31

[divider]Two New Trails For Bantry Bay[/divider]

The Bantry Bay trail locations are yet to be revealed, but do get excited it’s going to be a great addition to the existing trails of Manly Dam to provide a bigger loop network.

Trailscapes 34
Trail building is serious business! Tony suits up for battle.

Trailscapes 35

Trailscapes 36

Trailscapes 37
Tony Nolan, who’s been riding Manly Dam since 1995 and is currently working on the new trails at Bantry Bay, couldn’t keep the grin off his face discussing the future of the new trails at Bantry Bay and remedial work at Manly Dam.
Trailscapes 38
Yet more protection. It’s tough work day in, day out.
Trailscapes 39
“You just don’t use a wheelbarrow of dirt and you’re done”
Trailscapes 40
The Bantry Bay Trailscapes crew. Just one happy family.

 

Trailscapes 50
The surfaces are capped with only locally sourced materials, under strict guidance from National Parks.

Trailscapes 49

Trailscapes 48
It’s going to be a nice riding trail, quite tight and twisty through the beautiful National Park.
Trailscapes 47
Maite Petrement, full time trail builder with one of her favourite sections of trail.
Trailscapes 46
The trail work at Bantry Bay isn’t easy, the location is so remote that helicopters have been used to drop supplies such as rocks and dirt near the site.
Trailscapes 45
The time has come Sydney. Fresh, legal trails on the way!

Trailscapes 44

Trailscapes 43
Watch your head! These bags aren’t light!
Trailscapes 42
Trails don’t build themselves! Tony showing his team how it’s done with the mattock! “All of these trails are going to be amazing to ride,” said Tony.