20 Dec 2017

We can recall our first experience on the RockShox Pike about four years ago; we were blown away by its smooth action and robust chassis. Everyone loved it. For 2018 the Pike is back with a complete redesign, join us for a quick look at what's new.

Since the RockShox Lyrik came onto the scene to handle bikes with upwards of around 160mm travel, the RockShox Pike can now refocus entirely on the all-mountain/trail segment. With that in mind, the designers of the new Pike were able to make some legitimate improvements.

The fork that had a significant impact on the suspension game has lifted its own game.

RockShox Pike 2018: Lighter, leaner, ripped.

150g has shaved off the outgoing Pike without losing any stiffness, not bad at all! The new chassis looks visibly entirely different upon closer inspection the lower legs and crown look very lean. With thicker upper tubes, the fork retains the desired amount of stiffness, but make sure you only use the new slightly smaller grey coloured Bottomless Tokens in the new fork instead of the older red ones when tuning the air spring volume.

The new Pike’s chassis is visibly leaner than the previous model.

Boost only, Plus compatible all around.

By offering the new Pike in a Boost 110mm wide axle, the engineers were able to maximise the weight saving by focussing on manufacturing just the one lower chassis. There are available in both wheel sizes though and can accept up to 2.8″ tyres found on plus size bikes.

Boost axle width only, but compatible with up to 2.8″ tyres.
180mm and up. The Pike is a direct mount for 180mm rotors; the FOX 34 can accept a 160mm rotor, and needs an adaptor for 180.

Clearance updated because everything is so big nowadays.

With the boost hubs pushing the width of the overall forks out, and many frame designs becoming pretty bulky with large tubing – take a look at the Trek Remedy for example – another focus with the new fork is to increase clearance, hence a new super-low profile top cap.

The new air assembly upper uses a low profile cap and fixed with a cassette tool fitting.

Updated damper to increase performance.

The Charger 2 damper comes out of years of refinement and development of designing air springs to match the forks intended use and the three compression modes are more ‘useable’. With a remote option available also.


New Debonair spring for better feel and spring rates for trail riding.

The new Debonair is said to feel more supple but not in any way is it a short travel downhill fork, the ride is said to feel more sporty and lively. We’ll find out soon!


Price and weight?

Pike RCT3 DebonAir Boost Charger 2  – $1,299.95

Pike RCT3 DebonAir Remote Boost Charger 2 – $1,399.95

We put our test fork on the scales complete with the quick release Maxle and a cut 50mm steer tube and star nut fitted – 1.86kg


ShockWiz-it!

To help us with setup, we’ve cracked out the ShockWiz; this little data analysis thing is pretty amazing, read more about it here: Quark ShockWiz.

The nifty suspension setup tool – Quark ShockWiz.

Fox 34 vs RockShox Pike?

We are comparing the two big guns of the mountain bike world, head to head. We’ve spent some time on the FOX 34 already, and it’s pretty slick!

We’ll be fitting the two forks to our Norco Sight long term test bike, check it out here: Norco Sight.

The big showdown begins! Fox 34 vs RockShox Pike.

The FOX comes in touch lighter than the Pike at 1.78kg with a QR axle, 150mm steerer and star nut fitted and is priced a bit higher than the Pike we have at $1379.

Let’s ride!