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The not-so-minor details

Product

Shimano M163 shoes

Contact

Shimano Australia
www.shimano.com.au

Price

AUD189.00

Weight

750gm

Positives

Great pedal feel with good pedalling stiffness.
Grippy sole.
Top notch construction.
Lots of cleat adjustment.

Negatives

Kinda boring looking.

Shimano shoes are fantastic pieces of kit, with particularly legendary durability. But while Shimano have always made great cross-country shoes, and some great downhill shoes, the brand hasn’t really had an offering that was aimed specifically at the trail rider; you could choose either a stiff-soled cross country shoe, or a softer, but much bulkier, downhill shoe and not much in between.

Shimano M163 2
We ran the M163 shoes for the entirety of our recent trip to Queenstown and loved them.

We ran the M163 shoes for the entirety of our recent trip to Queenstown and loved them.

But now Shimano have filled that void, with two new shoes aimed at the trail/all-mountain market (ie. the kind of riding that most of us do day to day). One of these new shoes is the M163 (the other is the M200 – previewed here) – well-priced, understated and beautifully fitted shoes that we’ve been sullying with our stinky leg ends for the last couple of months.

While it’s too early to comment on whether or not this shoe lives up to Shimano’s usual standards of durability, we can definitely deliver a verdict on how this shoe fits and performs.

Shimano M163 (1)

Just riding along.

Shimano M163 5

TORBAL is all about longitudinal flex where it counts.

The M163 uses Shimano’s new TORBAL (Torsional Balance) system, which basically allows the shoes to offer a good degree of longitudinal flex through the midsole so you can roll your foot side to side and get better pedal feel, but retain pedalling stiffness under the ball of your foot. TORBAL, despite sounding like the name of a robotic dog, works like a charm and there’s great support on offer where it counts, but without any of that isolating woodenness that can come from a really stiff shoe.

Shimano M163 7

The opposing direction and offset positioning of the Cross X Strap system is designed to more evenly distribute pressure from the upper across your foot.

The Cross X-Strap and ratchet buckle closure provides a supple and secure fit, which ensures that your foot never feels like its floating or squirming in the shoe – as you roll your foot around in a corner, the upper moves with it, rather than your foot simply slipping about inside the shoe.

Shimano M163 6

The sole is grippy the whole way through, from toe to heel, and the longer cleat slots allow more positions than your standard Shimano shoe.

We particularly appreciate the longer-than-normal cleat positioning slot thingos, which allow you to run the cleat a long way back. Normally on a Shimano shoe, we have the cleat at the very back of its adjustment range, but on the M163s we’re closer to the middle. Having a more rearward cleat position puts less leverage on your ankles if you’re riding aggressively and landing hard. A handy little insert is also provided to plug up the large cleat holes and stop excessive mud or water getting in.

Shimano M163 4

Shimano’s ratchet buckles are strong and don’t get easily clogged like some brands’ buckles. On the M163, the leading edge of the buckle has a protective lip, to deflect impacts that could potentially damage the ratchet.

The M163 is built for a bit of rock scrambling too, with a fully rubberised sole – a blessing if you miss a pedal entry – and slim armouring around the generous toe box as well. Its big tread blocks aren’t super tacky like on some shoes (such as the Five Ten shoes we recently tested), but they are malleable and grippy all the same.

These are really ideal shoes for the masses, and exactly what we’ve been looking for from the big S; put ’em on, ride ’em up, ride ’em down, kick ’em about and repeat for many years.

 

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